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A Southern Road Film, Unafraid to Embrace Cliché

Something about a road trip makes for good storytelling. Even with the standard plot points of misadventures, close calls, new romances, and meaningful relationships forged after initial tension, the setting leaves room for intriguing bumps along the way.

Reviews

Body Heat

Amayra Rivera
Recent
Reviews

Kiss of the Spider Woman

The novel was ideal for independent filmmaking; the resulting film, even more than 20 years later, is still superb.

Matthew Sorrento
Reviews

Noise

The droning of a self-righteous windbag whom everyone has long since tuned out, rather like an annoying car alarm.

Reviews

The Incredible Hulk

One of the most “incredible” things about this so-called reinvention of the Hulk is how close it is to Ang Lee’s vision.

Reviews

Vantage Point

It’s almost rather brilliant the way the film betrays and sabotages itself as it comes down the home stretch.

Reviews

The Incredible Hulk

In The Incredible Hulk, Betty handles her role as The Girl in unusual and frankly charming ways: she's easily the film's most impressive effect.

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The Return of the Popcorn Circus: June 2008

If May almost tent-poled itself out of existence, June will be even worse. After all, are audiences really ready for 13 major release in less than two months -- with more to come?

Reviews

Into the Wild

A "follow your dreams" narrative in a package that belies the cliché that it expounds upon.

Reviews

Vantage Point

As Vantage Point becomes increasingly busy with personal betrayals and redemptions, the ostensible politics, reductive to begin with, fall by the wayside.

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Gone and Not Forgotten: The PopMatters DVD Wish List

A lot of good movies are still missing from DVD. Here is a list of 25 that PopMatters feels have been unceremoniously left to simply fade away.

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Accepting the Blame: The Top Guilty Pleasures of 2007

PopMatters proffers its collection of 2007's most notable defective faves. And it's okay to laugh. After all, we'd probably do the same to you and your uncomfortable fixations as well.

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A Gallery of Good Works: The Best Films of 2007

From Julian Schnabel's artsy The Diving Bell and the Butterfly to the legendary Coen Brothers splendid adaptation of Cormac McCarthy's No Country for Old Men, PopMatters counts down the 30 best films of 2007.

Film

Into the Wild

Into the Wild reveals the sense of loss that drove Chris McCandless. It also shows that it isn't only his.

Reviews

Neverwas

How did a first time writer/ director manage to nab even one of these big guns, let alone a whole gaggle of them? Would that Neverwas never were…

Jake Meaney
Reviews

Mr. Brooks (2007)

Even as you're wondering just how tedious the movie might get, William Hurt pops up to offer his snarky, sniffy version of "advice," and Mr. Brooks turns into something else.

Film

Future Shock: The Death of Serious Science Fiction

The serious Science Fiction film genre is dead or at least on cinematic life support. As the new millennial marches forward, and an omnipresent production paradigm that substitutes spectacle for smarts, futurist filmmaking is definitely gasping for breath.

Film

Monkey Business (Part 2: June)

Apparently, as the sun's strongest rays finally settle over the movie going public, sequels are the remedy to cool down an overheated demographic. This month alone holds five examples of such redux refreshment. The rest of the choices are a variety pack of genres, ideas and possibilities.

Reviews

The Good Shepherd (2006)

For Edward, the CIA forms a circular logic: members define the mission and vice versa.

Reviews

Nightmares & Dreamscapes: From the Stories of Stephen King

Adapting Stephen King's short stories, Nightmares & Dreamscapes preserves their spirit as well as their eerie plots.

Dan Carlson
Film

The King (2005)

Though Elvis seems impelled by the memory of his dead Mexican mother and trained to deliver a certain calculated violence, his power is illusory.

Film

A History of Violence (2005)

This slippage between myth and realism, or maybe expectation and consummation, is precisely the genius of A History of Violence.

Cynthia Fuchs
Reviews

The Village (2004)

'I have to keep doing things that scare me, and this certainly scares me,' says M. Night Shyamalan.

Cynthia Fuchs
Film

The Village (2004)

Noah is so wrapped up in his own emotions that he seems, at first, the most literal embodiment of the film's critique of a post-9/11 American isolationism.

Cynthia Fuchs
Film

Tuck Everlasting (2002)

While the book is laced with a youthful sense of wonder concerning life and death, the film is a troubled teenage love story.

Amy Sidwar

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