Music

The 100 Best Classic Progressive Rock Songs: Part 3, 60-41

Photo: Yes, Fragile

Welcome back, my friends to the show that never ends. It's the 100 best classic progressive rock songs.

60. Rush: "Cygnus X-1 Book One: The Voyage"

(from A Farewell to Kings)

Rush is now, rightly, in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame (not that this dubious honor from a very polemic institution signifies all that much, but in terms of street cred from the so-called establishment, it's noteworthy, and warranted enshrinement), so the battles waged over their merit aren't waged with quite the rage they once were. That's mostly a good thing. But whether you think they are Ayn Rand worshippers (wrong) or Neil Peart is an overrated drummer (wrong again) or his lyrics are rubbish (wrong again), and especially if you care to debate the merits of their musicianship (give it up), one thing is overlooked, and requires pointing out: Geddy Lee, for a skinny, nerdy white man, is not only a brilliant bass player, but when the situation required it, he could flat out groove. His work alone on "Cygnus X-1 Book One" makes an eloquent case for his expertise, but of all Rush songs, this one features the most frequently sited reason so many people can't deal: his voice.

Over time, and of necessity, his high pitched histrionics were relegated to time capsules of the ‘70s. But by the time the intensity is ratcheted up to the point of explosion, his wail is prog's version of Whitman's barbaric yawp. Deal breaker for some; addictive for others. This song, were it an instrumental, would be capable of converting many naysayers, but of course, it needs the singular paroxysms Geddy delivered, as a matter of course, circa 1977.

 
59. King Crimson: "I Talk to the Wind"

(from In the Court of the Crimson King)

Virtually each note on King Crimson's debut at once originates and defines the prog rock aesthetic. This was, in every possible sense, an entirely new sort of music: a collective of superlative craftsmen, united in the effort to create art so original, so unmotivated by commercial appeal, so honest, it couldn't not be transformative. If the progressive movement would, for both understandable and perhaps inevitable reasons, become insular to the point of near-suffocation with its one-upmanship, navel-gazing and self-indulgent geekishness, no such criticism could be applied to both the material and attitude that inform In the Court of the Crimson King. (Interesting sidenote: this song was initially attempted on 1968's The Cheerful Insanity of Giles, Giles and Fripp, featuring vocals by Judy Dyble.)

As a part of the whole, "I Talk to the Wind" is an ideal transition, calming the waters after the incendiary "21st Century Schizoid Man" and setting up the concentrated dejection of "Epitaph"; as a standalone track, it's a stunning tone poem of melancholy -- somehow it manages to be somber and gorgeous. Each individual musician is indispensable (on this song; on this album), and while drummer Michael Giles' subdued but industrious embellishments shine, this might be Ian McDonald's finest moment: his flute, clarinet and shared vocals (with Greg Lake) are astonishing; an unending well that will satisfy and inspire even after countless listens.

 
58. Renaissance: "Mother Russia"

(from Turn of the Cards)

More literary references? Yes please. This time, tribute is paid to Russian writer/dissident Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. As such, the lyrics deal with the (ongoing, at this time) bad old days of being "back in the U.S.S.R.". Driven by John Tout's stirring keyboards and Annie Haslam's ardent vocals (another rare instance of any kind of female presence in the mostly all-male prog genre), complete with only slightly melodramatic string ornamentations, "Mother Russia" effectively doles out the emotion along with the intellect.

 
57. Pink Floyd: "Welcome to the Machine"

(from Wish You Were Here)

Roger Waters, illustrating curmudgeonly tendencies as early as the recording of The Dark Side of the Moon (captured for posterity in the remarkable Live at Pompeii documentary), but having axes to grind -- and never too carefully -- going back to "Corporal Clegg" on A Saucerful of Secrets (1968), was really hitting his sardonic stride by the middle of the ‘70s. Importantly, though, while he shoveled out the scorn like few before or since, it would be wrong to label Waters a misanthrope; certainly he's happy (or miserable, for that matter) to point out the myriad foibles of mankind, but there was always hope, if never quite optimism, lurking beneath the surface.

By the time of Wish You Were Here, Floyd had perfected their presentation: the music they created suitably complemented Waters's acerbic lyrics. On "Welcome to the Machine" an acoustic-based song is soaked with sound effects, Rick Wright's one-man-band of keyboards and suitably disaffected vocal from David Gilmour. It's to Waters's credit that the song can function on several levels: as an obvious shot at the music industry (amusing sidenote: the lyrics for "Have a Cigar" were so astringent Gilmour declined to sing them, which led to Roy Harper stepping in for his famous cameo), it's another in a series of touching tributes to Syd Barrett ("you dreamed of a big star/you played a mean guitar"), and a coruscating ode to estrangement. No band made alienation sound so alluring.

 
56. Van der Graaf Generator: "Man-Erg"

(from Pawn Hearts)

We'll never see Van der Graaf Generator getting the Spinal Tap or Flight of the Conchords treatment. It's impossible, because this stuff is already beyond parody -- and that's meant in a (mostly) good way. For those who find the most out-there Gabriel era Genesis and Gentle Giant too compromised, this is the stuff. Vocalist Peter Hammill presents an all-or-nothing gauntlet thrown down and, like Gabriel, he has eccentricity to spare. Bonus points for David Jackson's sax playing; normally an embellishment or anomaly, in VdGG, the sax was part of the package.

 
55. Camel: "Lunar Sea"

(from Moonmadness)

The last song on the last album from the original line-up, "Lunar Sea" is a fitting way to close out a classic quartet of albums. Unsurprisingly, the playing on this instrumental piece is top notch, with obligatory time signature shifts and plenty of room for each musician to stretch out. Andrew Latimer's work is typically tasty, and while some of his fellow guitar heroes tended toward effusiveness, he's always a study in concision. This one also features some of keyboardist Peter Bardens's best work.

 
54. Gentle Giant: "In a Glass House"

(from In a Glass House)

Of all the prog bands who dabbled in classical music, either as inspiration or point of departure (and in some cases, lame imitation) Gentle Giant did the most to make it their own, resulting in a sort of chamber rock, high on proficiency, short on easy or accessible "hooks" and enduring as the epitome of integrity, for those with the attention span and interest. Amongst aficionados, In a Glass House is generally considered one of their more accessible efforts (as such, a recommended starting point for the uninitiated), as the band seems at once more confident and secure: where we had almost too many notes per square foot in previous works, the band is mostly content to "merely" pack every second with ideas and sounds, but all in the service of a specific mood or expression. As usual, the musicianship is impeccable, and the title track works as well as any other Gentle Giant song to summarize this band's idiosyncratic sensibility.

 
53. Steve Hackett: "Shadow of the Hierophant"

(from Voyage of the Acolyte)

What does a guitar god do when his band drops one of the decisive (and weirdest, and challenging, etc.) gems of the oeuvre, and then the singer abruptly departs? Carry on with the first of many solo efforts, naturally. Steve Hackett, even after the exhausting recording of and tour that followed The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway, was obviously in too much of a zone to consider either time off or sulking about Peter Gabriel's bridge-burning exodus. The result is, at once, a worthy inclusion in a long string of brilliant albums, but also a statement that the "sound" of Genesis during the first part of the ‘70s owed much to Hackett's splendid influence.

On "Shadow of the Hierophant" (look up "Hierophant" and nod, approvingly), Hackett pulls out all the stops: another epic in the style of "Firth of Fifth" (especially the extended outro), appropriate as he had able assistance from bandmates Phil Collins and Mike Rutherford, the real bonus comes courtesy of the vocals from Sally Oldfield (sister of you-know-who). Not that any of Hackett's previous work with Genesis felt constrained, but being in command here, he feels free to go wherever his restless mind—and fingers—take him, and it's an endlessly rewarding trip.

 
52. Genesis: "The Musical Box"

(from Nursery Cryme)

Speaking of both Genesis and trips, "The Musical Box" is the opening salvo of the first Genesis album to feature Hackett, and it's as wonderfully out there as anything anyone did in the prog era. Gentle Giant, as previously mentioned, perfected their "chamber prog", but for better or worse, it still seems at times impersonal or unreachable; "The Musical Box" still sounds like an old nursery rhyme (or cryme) come to life. Peter Gabriel, on stage in the early ‘70s, solidified his status as resident eccentric with a variety of costumes and hair styles and, mostly, just being wonderfully weird.

Much of what makes the work Genesis did during this era so remarkable is the way the compositions conjure up different times and places simply with words and music. Hackett's schizophrenic shrieking throughout suggests the darkness lurking beneath what begins as an almost tender ballad. It's also astonishing that, with one song and just under ten minutes, Genesis explores more moods and emotions than many bands could cram into a career.

 
51. Curved Air: "Marie Antoinette"

(from Phantasmagoria)

Like much (too much?) prog rock that tried so hard, if appraised as words on a page, a song like "Marie Antoinette" would likely be condemned as precious, self-parody or pretentious. Much of that potential judgment is assuaged by Sonja Kristina's placid vocals and the friction of Francis Monkman's guitar. Bands like Curved Air serve as necessary reminders that, in between decade dominated by pop music and the punk deconstruction that followed, music needed to take itself a bit seriously; it needed to assert itself as an art form before it was possible (and necessary) to scale things back and establish new paradigms.

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