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The Dr. Octagon Chronicles: Chapter 4

The Dr. Octagon Chronicles

"A Gorilla Driving a Pick-Up Truck" - Rob Sonic Road Rage Remix [MP3]

Chapter 4: Rob Sonic' Vs."A Gorilla Driving a Pick-Up Truck"

The Setting:

3 AM, a wet, but warm late night, or should we say early morn, in the Bronx. Def Jukie Rob Sonic finds himself, as he has many times, at his favorite joint, The Telicatessen. His head in his hands, elbows on the table, over a cup of the blackest cup of Joe this side of 110th Street, he recounts the events to the evening.

Earlier That Night:

A blowout party downtown was taking place in the honor of slain sucker MCs. Rob's place at the bar was firmly in place when a hand drops on his left shoulder. As he turns to find no one there he returns face forward to a small box on the bar. "What the ... "

The box reads "For your eyes only." He expects it's a joke played on him and decides to pause on the opening.

Back at The Telicatessen:

A strange headache has descended on Rob by this point and the short stack with sausage hasn't helped the cause. A solid stroke of the cloth napkin to clean his lips and leaves his staring back at the mysterious box. "Screw it, ..." he mumbles to himself as he grabs the knife beside him, gives the box a shake and digs in. The contents reveal two things; a CD burn labeled "Dr Octagon" with a Sharpie and a note from OCD saying:

"This is what I wanted you to hear."

"What ever..." He says to himself as he drops two Lincolns on the table face down and nods to the cute waitress behind the counter.

As Rob looks up and heads to the door he swears he sees from the corner of his eye two beady eyes glowing green through the window. But it's late and he plays it off to exhaustion.

On the way to the car an eerie feeling of being followed consumes him. Nothing but shadows behind him yet still the feeling persists. His pace quickens... Movement to his right... Shuffles heard to the left ... and a strange musty smell floats in the air. He darts to the car and locks the door with a feeling of momentary safety.

The disc still in hand, he slips it in the player and kicks on the ignition. The track begins, the gas pedal descends and he pulls off. Soon after Rob feels a sharp shock as his car is bumped from behind. Looking in the rearview mirrors, he sees a green pick up truck, just inches behind him. A large, dark, muscle-bound figure is behind the wheels. The pickup drops back and smashes them again. This time, a taillight is broken off. Rob expels expletives "What the f#@k!"

Rob accelerates, pushing 70 mph, trying to escape this madman insisting on a dangerous high-speed chase. The truck changes left, then right, then back again trying to overtake Rob's vehicle. Rob glances at the gas tank gauge on his dashboard - It's getting close to empty. Rob is surprised; he distinctly remembers filling up just earlier that day. Rob searches for a truck stop but there doesn't seem to be any in sight. Bam! The truck hits him again.

He turns back...

"What the ...!? Is that a gorilla?"

The rest unfolds ...as such.

"A Gorilla Driving a Pick-Up Truck" - Rob Sonic Road Rage Remix [MP3]

Previous Chapters:

The Gray Kid Al Greezy remix [MP3]

Al Green: The Gray Kid Al Greezy remix [MP3]

Mike Relm 20-minute Return of Dr Octagon megamix [MP3]

The Return of Dr Octagon hits stores June 27th.

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