Music

Singer/Songwriter Tiphanie Doucet Channels Bittersweet Confessions on 'Under My Sun' (album premiere)

Jordan Blum

Each folk pop composition on singer/songwriter Tiphanie Doucet's debut LP, Under My Sun, offers something special.

Having starred in both Le bébé d'Elsa (as a teenager) and the Glee-like Chante! a decade ago, French singer/songwriter Tiphanie Doucet is already an established artistic presence in her homeland. Likewise, her short time in the country-esque outfit Milk demonstrated her passion and aptitude for a formal musical career. Now, with her upcoming debut solo LP, Under My Sun, she hopes to spread her lovely folk pop candidness to the whole world. Filled with earnest songwriting (sung in both French and English) and calming instrumentation, it's a richly poignant and pastoral journey that reveals Doucet as a master of the style.

Produced in the Catskill Mountains by Simone Felice (the Lumineers, Bat for Lashes, Jade Bird), Under My Sun is inspired by artists like Norah Jones, Ingrid Michaelson, and Feist. (At times, it also channels the most organic and sparse sides of Sia, Greg Laswell, Tori Amos, and David Gray.) As for its topics and themes, Doucet reveals that the "heartbreak and homesickness" she felt after moving to America served as "a wellspring of musical inspiration". As such, its "bittersweet meditation[s] on love and relationships" are mostly autobiographical yet wholly universal.

Although there's a prevailing sense of scant acoustic elegance that makes the collection feel unified, each composition offers something special. Of course, the opening title track allures with its warm arpeggios, wistful vocals, easygoing percussion, and delicate piano and string accompaniments (courtesy of David Baron, Anneke Schaul-Yoder, and Felice). While several other selections exist in a similar air ("Shadow of You", "Les Miroirs", and closer "9 Bar Café"), pieces like "Dors" and "She" offer a faster pace and lusher symphonic arrangement. Meanwhile, "Come to Me" proves especially inviting with its handclaps and optimistic splendor, whereas "Peace of Heart" is a fervent gem in every way, making it a clear standout of the bunch. Really, every song culminates beautifully to make Under My Sun a piercing, elegant statement.

Check out the whole record below and pick up a copy when it releases this Friday.

Music


Books


Film


Recent
Music

Dancing in the Street: Our 25 Favorite Motown Singles

Detroit's Motown Records will forever be important as both a hit factory and an African American-owned label that achieved massive mainstream success and influence. We select our 25 favorite singles from the "Sound of Young America".

Music

The Durutti Column's 'Vini Reilly' Is the Post-Punk's Band's Definitive Statement

Mancunian guitarist/texturalist Vini Reilly parlayed the momentum from his famous Morrissey collaboration into an essential, definitive statement for the Durutti Column.

Love in the Time of Coronavirus

What Will Come? COVID-19 and the Politics of Economic Depression

The financial crash of 2008-2010 reemphasized that traumatic economic shifts drive political change, so what might we imagine — or fear — will emerge from the COVID-19 depression?

Music

Datura4 Take Us Down the "West Coast Highway Cosmic" (premiere)

Australia's Datura4 deliver a highway anthem for a new generation with "West Coast Highway Cosmic". Take a trip without leaving the couch.

Music

Teddy Thompson Sings About Love on 'Heartbreaker Please'

Teddy Thompson's Heartbreaker Please raises one's spirits by accepting the end as a new beginning. He's re-joining the world and out looking for love.

Love in the Time of Coronavirus

Little Protests Everywhere

Wherever you are, let's invite our neighbors not to look away from police violence against African Americans and others. Let's encourage them not to forget about George Floyd and so many before him.

Music

Carey Mercer's New Band Soft Plastics Score Big with Debut '5 Dreams'

Two years after Frog Eyes dissolved, Carey Mercer is back with a new band, Soft Plastics. 5 Dreams and Mercer's surreal sense of incongruity should be welcomed with open arms and open ears.

Music

Sondre Lerche Rewards 'Patience' with Clever and Sophisticated Indie Pop

Patience joins its predecessors, Please and Pleasure, to form a loose trilogy that stands as the finest work of Sondre Lerche's career.

Film

Ruben Fleischer's 'Venom' Has No Bite

Ruben Fleischer's toothless antihero film, Venom is like a blockbuster from 15 years earlier: one-dimensional, loose plot, inconsistent tone, and packaged in the least-offensive, most mass appeal way possible. Sigh.

Books

Cordelia Strube's 'Misconduct of the Heart' Palpitates with Dysfunction

Cordelia Strube's 11th novel, Misconduct of the Heart, depicts trauma survivors in a form that's compelling but difficult to digest.

Music

Reaching For the Vibe: Sonic Boom Fears for the Planet on 'All Things Being Equal'

Sonic Boom is Peter Kember, a veteran of 1980s indie space rockers Spacemen 3, as well as Spectrum, E.A.R., and a whole bunch of other fascinating stuff. On his first solo album in 30 years, he urges us all to take our foot off the gas pedal.

Film

Old British Films, Boring? Pshaw!

The passage of time tends to make old films more interesting, such as these seven films of the late '40s and '50s from British directors John Boulting, Carol Reed, David Lean, Anthony Kimmins, Charles Frend, Guy Hamilton, and Leslie Norman.

Reviews
Collapse Expand Reviews

Features
Collapse Expand Features
PM Picks
Collapse Expand Pm Picks

© 1999-2020 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved.
PopMatters is wholly independent, women-owned and operated.