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Film

Scorsese's 'World Cinema Project  No. 3' Has a Filtered Gaze

Scorsese's selections for World Cinema Project No. 3 recall an attitude typical of a bygone age of film studies when professors would rationalize overlooking the reactionary politics of a film because aspects of the filmmaking itself trumped such "trivial" concerns.

Film

Disruptive Films and Political Turmoil

Facet's Disruptive Film: Everyday Resistance to Power, Volume Two documents the multiple approaches a variety of filmmakers take in wielding video and celluloid for social change.

Film

Domesticity Marks a Deeply Fraught Terrain in Ida Lupino Films

The early Ida Lupino films hold a particular nuance for female characters and the textures of their everyday lives, which has rarely been exhibited in classical Hollywood filmmaking.

Film

The Rise and Fall of Female Silent Filmmakers

Filmmaking was only one element of a much wider feminist movement that was manifesting itself in various forms, from the flapper to the suffragette to the birth control advocate to the bohemian female writer and political activist.

Film

Adjusting the Focus on Somali-Americans: 'First Person Plural' and 'Muslim Youth Voices'

Eric Tretbar's First Person Plural and PBS' shorts Muslim Youth Voices both offer new representations of Somali-Americans. A significant contribution, given the Islamophobic frameworks that structure most cinema, television, and popular culture in general.

Film

Bill Gunn's 'Personal Problems' and a History of the Video Revolution

Kino Lorber's release of Personal Problems can be seen as a major intervention in recovering "lost" videotapes, representing an important black collective creative contribution of US grassroots videomaking.

Film

Wild Women, Forty Pricks, and Western Noir

Samuel Fuller's Forty Guns serves as a remarkable film that fuses the Western with film noir and provides ample space, at least during its first half, for Barbara Stanwyck to provide a commanding performance that hints at what a Western female heroine might look like.

Film

Framing White Nationalism in Spike Lee's 'BlacKkKlansman'

Spike Lee's BlacKkKlansman most dramatically reveals how race is a performance, not a biological essence, as it focuses on the importance of language in structuring racial representations.

Film

Film's Overlooked Histories: Charles Burnett and the L.A. Rebellion

The general absence of the L.A. Rebellion from most film history text books and Burnett's relative marginalization within film and media studies speaks to the socio-economic myopia and privileges that define both areas of study.

Film

The Toxic Masculinity of Stanley Kubrick's 'Barry Lyndon'

Barry Lyndon suggests that all violence—wars, duels, boxing, and the like—is nothing more than subterfuge for masculine insecurities and romantic adolescent notions, which in many ways come down to one and the same thing.

Film

'Stalker' Warns of a World Where Escape Can Lead to New Forms of Imprisonment

Tarkovksy’s cinema dialogues with the current chaos of rising authoritarian regimes in the West and the threat of nuclear devastation as the United States and North Korea rattle their sabers.

Film

'The Watermelon Woman', or, Whatever Happened to New Queer Cinema?

A disturbing trend is arising; if you want your film to be nominated for the Academy Awards, it cannot potentially offend the sensibilities of the most narrow-minded “gay friendly” viewer.

Reviews

Enterprising Women and the Femme Fatale of Film Noir

'Too Late for Tears' and 'Woman on the Run' remind us that today's financial and gender anxieties have long histories.

Film

'Disruptive Film' Creates a Constellation Where the Past and Present Meet

One should approach this collection not unlike how Walter Benjamin approached collecting books: ".... not as dry, isolated facts, but as a harmonious whole..."

Film

The Dardennes' Laboring Body in 'Two Days, One Night'

Although one might hesitate to call this a propaganda film for labor, it nonetheless expresses concern for those who labor by exploring how precarious working conditions affect one’s daily lives.

Film

Jean-Luc Godard: A Montage of Attractions

The montage approach that Jean-Luc Godard celebrates in his films would become the driving force behind Historie(s) du cinéma.

SAVE / IGNORE: Labels

Caboose

Reviews

'Mr. Turner' Is a Film as a Canvas

Mr. Turner, the biopic of the famous painter J.M.W. Turner, speaks to the inherent difficulties of navigating the art world.

Film

Laughing Through the Great Depression With 'Sullivan's Travels'

The real charm of Sullivan’s Travels is the way it exposes Hollywood’s mediation of the Depression and the trauma it inflicted.

Reviews

'Dear White People' Untangles Complicated Relations of Racism and Identity

This film's ability to balance character-driven stories with didactic critiques against the racist practices that haunt our daily lives speaks to a sophisticated outlook rare among first-time directors.

Film

'Boyhood' and the Transcendence of the Everyday

Boyhood returns to the view that originated with Italian Neorealism: documenting everyday life is the biggest spectacle one could capture on film.


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