Recent
Reviews

The Weeping Meadow (2004)

Angelopoulos is a filmmaker who deserves to be seen on a large-scale theatre screen, but always, his work should be seen.

David Sanjek
Reviews

À Double Tour (1959)

À Double Tour is a visually engrossing if emotionally underwhelming thriller set in one the director's prototypically dysfunctional families.

David Sanjek
Film

Getting Something Out

Claude Chabrol is not only one of the most prolific of the New Wave filmmakers (over 50 films in nearly 50 years), but also committed to genre-based narrative.

David Sanjek
Reviews

Teorema (1968)

However much the camera lingers on Terrence Stamp's features or Silvana Mangano's heavily made up face, the characters remain corporeally opaque, more embodiments of ideas than urges and appetites.

David Sanjek
Reviews

So Wrong They're Right (1993) - PopMatters Film Review )

However much one admires their chutzpah and the enthusiasm of their subjects, So Wrong They're Right proves to be more entertaining than edifying.

David Sanjek
Reviews

Bong Joon Ho's 'Memories of Murder' (Salinui chueok)

Bong Joon Ho's Memories of Murder not only brings a fresh perspective to the forensics subgenre, but also thoughtfully considers Korea's political framework.

David Sanjek
Film

Searching for the Wrong-Eyed Jesus (2004)

Jim White acts as tour guide in this film addressing the 'Southern obsession with the dichotomy between the sacred and the profane.'

David Sanjek
Film

Thrills

Harold Lloyd was one of the most and successful silent film comedians. And yet, for today's audiences, he remains mostly unknown. In his day, however, Lloyd rivaled Chaplin and Keaton at the box office, making films for over 20 years.

David Sanjek
Reviews

Bright Future (Akarui mirai) (2003)

One of the most attractive aspects of Kiyoshi Kurosawa's style is his implicit trust in his audience's intelligence.

David Sanjek
Reviews

Strangers When We Meet (1960/2005)

Strangers When We Meet is a melodramatic tale of extramarital unhappiness amongst fast-track suburbanites.

David Sanjek
Reviews

The Harvest (1993)

David Marconi's screenplay is redeemed by its interest in messing with our minds rather than trotting out the requisite local color and visual shortcuts.

David Sanjek
Reviews

The Naked Jungle (1954)

What sets this Naked Jungle apart is a remarkably astute depiction of the collision of the sexes, in its addition of a mail order bride for the protagonist.

David Sanjek
Film

Monkey King

As a filmmaker, Jerry Lewis reveled in the possibilities of widescreen cinematography, stereophonic sound, and audacious bursts of Technicolor.

David Sanjek
Reviews

SCTV Volume 2

The material shows how much the SCTV crew did not engage in either obvious parody or simple knee-jerk laughs.

David Sanjek
Reviews

The Grissom Gang (1971)

Like his characters, Robert Aldrich went for broke, taking his audiences on a thrill ride that could be thoughtful and hair-raising at the same time.

David Sanjek
Reviews

The White Dawn (1974)

While the indigenous people mock their guests as the spawn of dogs, they nonetheless save them from death and offer them shelter.

David Sanjek
Reviews

SCTV Network/90: Volume 1

These were smart people who figured out a way to make sketch comedy work in a 90-minute format.

David Sanjek
Reviews

The Flower of Evil (La Fleur Du Mal) (2003)

Claude Chabrol keeps the forces that threaten to tear the family asunder, for the most part, submerged.

David Sanjek
Reviews

Lord Love a Duck (1966)

Lord Love a Duck illustrates, with corrosive wit, how the mindless pursuit of status will be the death of us all.

David Sanjek
Reviews

The Edge of the World (1937)

Michael Powell's The Edge of the World reveals the unshakable conviction that film should overwhelm the audience with an artist's deliberately crafted vision.

David Sanjek
Reviews

Bonjour Tristesse (1958)

Draws much of its visual and dramatic effectiveness from Preminger's intelligent use of the screen process of the 1950s, Cinemascope.

David Sanjek
Reviews

Le Cercle Rouge (1970)

It was one of Melville's most commercially successful features, which comes as little surprise considering the pedigree of its stars.

David Sanjek
Reviews

The Marrying Kind (1952)

Hollywood did not allow Holliday to display the full range of her talent and intelligence; most of her roles were variants of the 'dumb blonde'.

David Sanjek
Reviews
Collapse Expand Reviews

Features
Collapse Expand Features
PM Picks
Collapse Expand Pm Picks

© 1999-2020 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved.
PopMatters is wholly independent, women-owned and operated.