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Film

Tea and Scones Suspense: Hitchcock's "English" Movies of the Early 1940s

Although Hitchcock left Great Britain for the United States in 1939, his first two films -- Rebecca (1940) and Suspicion (1941) -- nonetheless remained set firmly in English culture. His depictions helped craft perceptions of English life for decades to come.

Farisa Khalid
Books

Now, Voyager: Barry Hill's 'Peacemongers'

'Peacemongers', by the Australian poet and journalist Barry Hill, is an epic travelogue and probing meditation on the importance and elusiveness of peace.

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University of Queensland Press

Books

The Butterfly and the Scorpion: 'Whistler: A Life for Art's Sake'

This biography of James Whistler is full of sharp notes of detail and anecdotes that help one glean various shades of his inscrutable personality

Reviews

Une Énigme Politique: ‘A Taste for Intrigue: The Many Lives of François Mitterrand'

Philip Short's book is a masterfully written, sweeping narrative of Mitterrand’s life with decisive, revealing anecdotes and a meticulous chronicling of fact that is remarkable enough to be fiction.

Reviews

Peace is a Relative Term: 'War in Peace: Paramilitary Violence in Europe after the Great War'

On the postwar repercussions of poor diplomacy and inept decision-making in economic and foreign policy that led to the widespread nationalism across Europe during the interwar years.

Reviews

Through a Glass Darkly: 'American Mirror: The Life and Art of Norman Rockwell'

Deborah Solomon’s incisive biography shows us a hitherto unseen side of the celebrated illustrator—one that’s complex, neurotic and darker than the images of breezy Americana that he made famous.

Reviews

The Gathering Storm: Margaret MacMillan's 'The War That Ended Peace'

As the centenary of WWI approaches, historian Margaret MacMillan gives us an account of the inexorable path to war that's at once sweeping and tragic.

Books

Guston's Ghosts: 'Out of Time: Philip Guston and the Refiguration of American Postwar Art'

Robert Slifkin's book on Philip Guston is an incantatory debut work that shows us a compelling new side of the artist's famous Marlborough paintings.

Reviews

These Vagabond Blues: 'John O'Hara's The New York Stories'

The new Penguin edition of John O'Hara's short stories set in New York City is a treasure for any O'Hara fan. They show the master at his best--salty, cynical and at times, disarmingly sentimental.

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Now, Voyager: 'Kon-Tiki' and the Old World Adventure Saga

Kon-Tiki, a joint Norwegian and Hollywood venture, is the filmic version of the Millais painting. It’s romantic and hokey and about as subtle as a Norman Rockwell or a movie like Kick-Ass, but it’s a beautiful movie nonetheless.

Reviews

David Yezzi's Work in Fluency, Grace and Agility

The poet David Yezzi is considered by many critics to be one of the leading voices of his generation. His new book of poems is an impressive, beautifully laid-out collection, with something for everyone.

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Carnegie Mellon University Press

Reviews

The Savage Grace in John O'Hara's Classic, 'Appointment in Samarra'

This new edition of John O'Hara's 1934 novel, with its brilliant introduction by Charles McGrath, gives us a fresh look at an American masterpiece about a majestic and devastating downfall.

Books

Les Fantômes d’Empire: 'Vanishing Paradise'

Art historian Elizabeth Childs' new book on Paul Gauguin and John La Farge shows us how the colonial imagination contributed to the exoticism associated with Tahiti and the South Seas.

Books

The Heart Is An Unknown Country: 'Bobcat and Other Stories' by Rebecca Lee

This collection of short stories is a sharp, seductive venture into the foibles of marriage, infidelity and friendship among today's 30- and 40-somethings, with echoes of Updike, Freudenberger and Noah Baumbach.

Film

Farewell, Maestro: Rituparno Ghosh (1963-2013)

Upon the untimely death of the Indian film director Rituparno Ghosh, PopMatters remembers his remarkable career as a director, screenwriter and activist.

Reviews

The Cosmos, Artfully Captured: 'Influences: Art, Optics, and Astrology in the Italian Renaissance'

The art historian Mary Quinlan-McGrath takes an incisive look into how astrology and the science of optics played a significant role in the art of 15th and 16th century Italy.

Books

The Shock of the Old: Art Historian Alexander Nagel on His New Book, 'Medieval Modern'

New York University art historian Alexander Nagel talks with PopMatters about how art of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance is tied to modern and contemporary art in more ways than we might think.

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Zone

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Thames & Hudson

Interviews

The Civil War's 'Young Napoleon': An Interview with Richard Slotkin

Renowned cultural critic and historian Richard Slotkin discusses his new book, The Long Road to Antietam, and shares his thoughts on the future of American Studies. He indulges us with his favorite movies, too.


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