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Books

Diving for Memories in Neil Gaiman's 'The Ocean at the End of the Lane'

The best-written book of Neil Gaiman’s career is focused, lyrical, and profoundly perceptive in its exploration of childhood and memory, and it’s also quite frightening—like one of Truman Capote’s holiday stories by way of Stephen King.

Books

Cogito, Ergo Sum (or Thereabouts): 'Neil Gaiman and Philosophy: Gods Gone Wild!'

For readers with only a cursory understanding of Western philosophy, this book might seem intimidating, but there's no need for worry. When the primary philosophers on call are Plato, Descartes, Nietzsche, and Sartre, it’s pretty clear we’re only coloring out of the Crayola box of eight.

Books

'Bruce Springsteen, Cultural Studies, and the Runaway American Dream'

Since nothing kills street cred like unsolicited love from the establishment, news of a collection of scholarly essays on Bruce Springsteen might provoke skepticism, even fear. It needn’t. As awkward shows of affection go, this one is actually pretty good.

Books

Notes Written in the Sand: Neil Gaiman, Leslie Klinger and 'The Annotated Sandman'

The Sandman takes readers through the kingdom of dreams, and Neil Gaiman, like a magnificently deranged Gnostic tour guide, spends as much time off-road, exploring the diversions, back roads, dives, and alleyways of his story, as he spends on the main highway.

Theatre

O Captain! My Captain! Going Where No Octogenarian Has Gone Before

As "Bill" explores the meaninglessness of celebrity, "Shatner" embraces the shallow and the superficial like an Andy Warhol soup can come to life.

Books

The People Could Fly: 'Super Black: American Pop Culture and Black Superheroes'

Even though a contemporary eye can find both amusing and offensive stereotypes in many of these comics, compared to the nadir of TV's “Ghetto Man”, they seem like they could have been written by Ralph Ellison.

Books

We Can Be Heroes: Talking 'Supergods' with Grant Morrison

Grant Morrison’s ability to make connections between seemingly humdrum events and grandiose ideas becomes infectious. Reading Supergods and immersing in his ideas gives one as much kick as a radioactive spider bite.

Television

Have Yourself a Counter-Culture XMas: Red-Nosed Misfits, Elven Outlaws & Bearded Marxists

The TV versions of Rudolph, Santa, and Frosty are chaotic, freewheeling, and anarchic -- closer in spirit to Heath Ledger's Joker than to Bing Crosby's Father O'Malley.

Books

And Here's to You, Mr. Robinson: 'Jerry Robinson: Ambassador of Comics'

In a conversation with Jerry Robinson, the man who created the Joker, we learn he is much like the superheroes with which he will forever be identified; his career reflects a lifetime of pushing boundaries, challenging conventions, and fighting for artistic integrity.

Books

'The Man With the Golden Touch:' Once Again, James Bond Escapes, Unscathed

Neither megalomaniacal villain nor forgettable victim, Sinclair McKay manages to produce a book that works in many ways like a Bond film: it’s both smart and dumb, conventional and idiosyncratic, funny and dull, and in the end, it runs on too long.

SAVE / IGNORE: Labels

The Overlook Press

Reviews

'Freedom Summer': The Real Mississippi Burning

The explosive Mississippi summer of 1964 might have made for a good movie, but it makes for an even better book. Bruce Watson retells one of the most famous periods of the Civil Rights Movement which ought to be fiction, but sadly is not.


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