Please donate to help save PopMatters. We are moving to WordPress in December out of necessity and need your help.
Recent
Music

Eric Copeland: Hermaphrodite

Black Dice member Eric Copeland's solo debut is a vivid spectrum of giddy delights.

Music

Concentrick: Aluminum Lake

Tim Green steps aside from The Fucking Champs to release an underwhelming album as Concentrick.

Music

Arthur & Yu: In Cemera

Arthur & Yu deliver a Lee Hazlewood-invoking debut that is wonderful beyond any expectation.

Music

No Age: Weirdo Rippers

Swirling static and shimmer into pulses of riotous pleasure, Weirdo Rippers positions No Age as one of the most buzz-worthy and buzz-inducing bands of the year.

Music

Namelessnumberheadman: Wires Reply

Returning way too late to capitalize on the acclaim from their last album, the unfortunately titled Namelessnumberheadman delivers a lackluster effort almost entirely absent of any ingratiating quality.

Music

Jandek: The Ruins of Adventure

One of the most insular and prolific artists ever returns with another unnervingly fascinating work.

Music

Trembling Blue Stars: The Last Holy Writer

Twenty years into his career, Robert Wratten returns with another reliably disarming record.

Music

Je Suis France: Afrikan Majik

Swelling to nine members, Je Sui France delivers a scattershot third effort of impressive ambition yet underwhelming impact.

Music

Lavender Diamond: Calvary of Light

A modestly unlikely Matador signing, Lavender Diamond debut with a humbly humdrum introduction.

Music

Frog Eyes: Tears of the Valedictorian

Reining in the madness, Frog Eyes sacrifice too much of their enigmatic tension for the sake of refinement.

Music

Deerhunter: Fluorescent Grey

Deerhunter's aptly titled Kranky debut Cryptograms earns its name moving from murky swamps of feedback and delay into shimmering swirls of crystalline hooks.

Music

Rock Plaza Central: Are We Not Horses?

Inspired by an elaborate concept, this breakthrough album is a homespun epic of humble origins and unbridled imagination.

Music

Various Artists: Imagine the Shapes

What's Your Rupture? compiles their prior releases for a rollicking album full of infectious angst and giddy angularity.

Music

New Young Pony Club: New Young Pony Club

New rave really isn't as striking as its prefix suggests. Not so much a revolution as a refinement, the movement as of yet is at most merely the more moneyed and sassy little sister to dance-punk.

Music

Love of Diagrams: Love of Diagrams

Once Love of Diagrams manage to unhinge their voices while keeping a lock down on the groove, their impact will be unnervingly devastating.

Music

Pas/Cal: Dear Sir

Over the past four years, Pas/Cal has been turning out an intriguing series of EPs.

Music

Tall Firs: Tall Firs

Eschewing any taint of the term "freak", New York trio Tall Firs are forging a different take on contemporary folk.

Music

Pink Nasty: Mold the Gold

Sara Beck is asking a lot of any listener. First they have to get through the unpleasantness of her performing name, Pink Nasty, and then they have to contend with some willfully divergent shifts in style.

Music

Dean & Britta: Back Numbers

Bouncing back from Luna's breakup, Dean Wareham and Britta Phillips return with an incredibly strong set of new songs and obscure covers.

Music

Menomena: Friend and Foe

After a striking debut, Menomena return with a dumbed down follow up that fails to capitalize on their strengths.

Music

Working for a Nuclear Free City: Working for a Nuclear Free City

Working for a Nuclear Free City debuts with an album of impressive scope, albeit not entirely flawless execution.

Josh Berquist
Music

Holy Shit: Stranded at Two Harbors

With a crackling collection of shambolic pop, Holy Shit prove as endearingly sophomoric as their name.

Music

The Blow: Paper Television

The Blow dumb down, reach out, and rise up with their strongest effort yet.

Josh Berquist

Reviews
Collapse Expand Reviews



Features
Collapse Expand Features

PM Picks
Collapse Expand Pm Picks

© 1999-2020 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved.
PopMatters is wholly independent, women-owned and operated.