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Xiu Xiu

Yes, a Xiu Xiu performance is intense. However, this intensity does not much involve an audience. It’s an intensity directed inward, with frontperson Jamie Stewart offering little to no interaction with the crowd -- indeed, very little eye contact at all.

Reviews

Sex Workers Art Show

Since its inception, the Sex Workers Art Show has advanced the conversation about sex work by opening the lines of communication and throwing a number of wrenches into the idiot side of American sex culture.

Books

The Artist's Joke by Jennifer Higgie

What is surprising is that so little of 20th-century art criticism has focused on humor in art.

Megan Milks
Reviews

Diamanda Galas

It'd be easy to parody Diamanda Galas, but a spoof would necessarily omit what's so stunning about her music: in all their ugly, abrasive glory, her songs redefine what music can and should be.

Reviews

Spoon

I’d never thought of Spoon as bourgie, but, suddenly, it seems obvious. After all, they play tight, melodic rock that’s just a little bit uppercrust. These guys are, dare I say it, adults...

Books

Wang in Love and Bondage by Xiaobo Wang

The novellas in Wang in Love and Bondage explore sex and subjectivity in different, all transgressive, ways.

Megan Milks
Reviews

Sparklehorse

It's almost as if Sparklehorse mastermind Mark Linkous would rather be hiding under the horse head that features so prominently in his lyrics and album art.

Books

Salmonella Men on Planet Porno by Yasutaka Tsutsui

There's a mean streak of misogyny that runs almost throughout the collection and tends to distract from everything else going on around it.

Megan Milks
Books

Women Who Write by Stefan Bollmann

The category "women who write" has been interpreted in its broadest sense, to refreshing effect.

Books

Rid of Me by Kate Schatz

PJ Harvey's Rid of Me still burns with a fever nearly 15 years after its release in 1993. It is an angry, throbbing album, barely containing the ragged voices within it.

Reviews

‘Aya’ by Marguerite Abouet and Clément Oubrerie

The book serves as a reminder of a period of greatness for a country that is now struggling to regain its footing.

Books

Courting Equality by Patricia A. Gozemba and Karen Kahn

The gay community is by no means united on the importance or prioritization of marriage rights.

Reviews

120 Days

Though they're national-award winners in Norway, and presumably professionals, 120 Days seemed surprised/insulted by Philly's inattention. What did they expect, us awaiting their arrival with bated breath?

Megan Milks
Reviews

Holy Fuck

Clinic is headlining, and a rep is handing out faux-surgical face masks at the entrance. I don't take one. I am a critical thinker. I've come for one reason alone: to see Holy Fuck’s fresh! new! one-of-a-kind! 35-mm film synchronizer.

Megan Milks
Books

The Call of the Weird by Louis Theroux

Lamb and Lynx showed signs of wanting to go mainstream, and describe Green Day as the equivalent of "pretty good for a commie band".

Megan Milks
Reviews

Nick Lachey [2006 Rewind]

Holy culture shock, Batman. I thought we'd squashed hysteria decades ago.

Megan Milks
Books

Supermodel by David Breskin

Perhaps Breskin went too far into the task of developing a full psychological portrait of a supermodel that he ended up giving her superwoman status as well.

Megan Milks
Music

Coming Soon: Tori Amos, A Collection of Collections

Tori Amos is a fascinating person and she will always be, among other things, the classically trained pianist who rebelled against her preacher father; sought inspiration from witch doctors and their drugs; made zany, unmediated statements in interviews; and proved that pianos are as liberating as guitars.

Megan Milks
Featured: Top of Home Page

LISTEN - Tori Amos: A Piano: The Collection

Megan Milks
Reviews

The End of Mr. Y by Scarlett Thomas

Where are all the female cult writers?

Megan Milks
Reviews

Nick Lachey

Holy culture shock, Batman. I thought we'd squashed hysteria decades ago.

Megan Milks
Reviews

A Short History of Tractors in Ukrainian by Marina Lewycka

[It is] about using the roots of one family's persistent psychodrama to view the greater crisis of war, power, and national/cultural upheaval.

Megan Milks
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