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Books

Ignorance, Fear, and Democracy in America

Anti-intellectualism in America is, sadly, older than the nation itself. A new collection of Richard Hofstadter's work from Library of America traces the history of ideas and cultural currents in American society and politics.

Books

First Tragedy, Then Farce, Then What?

Riffing off Marx's riff on Hegel on history, art historian and critic Hal Foster contemplates political culture and cultural politics in the age of Donald Trump in What Comes After Farce?

Books

To the Vector the Spoils: On McKenzie Wark's 'Capital Is Dead'

In a brave new world dominated by platforms such as Facebook, Uber, and Airbnb, and marked by anxiety in the Age of the Anthropocene, McKenzie Wark's Capital Is Dead eschews digital utopianism for a sense of urgency that recognizes things have gotten serious.

Books

'Can Democracy Work?' Is the Essential Question We Must Continue to Grapple With

James Miller's Can Democracy Work? is a coming-of-age story for a generation of Americans whose ideals of social, economic, and political progress foundered on the rocks of brute capitalist power.

Television

Anthony Bourdain: Motor City Wannabe

Celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain traveled the world, but his heart was in Motown.

Books

Weaponizing Culture

Curator and art activist Nato Thompson argues that culture is not just contested terrain, it is a tool used for asserting and maintaining power.

Books

Dead Man Counting: An Economic Ghost Story

Peter Fleming's new book Homo Economicus attempts to lay zombie capitalism to rest.

Books

It's Not Nice to Fool Mother Nature: 'Against the Anthropocene'

Scientists have been arguing for a new period in Earth's geological history, the Anthropocene. Cultural critic T.J. Demos offers a critical take on the concept, pro and con.

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Sternberg

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Sternberg Press

Politics

Poetry, Art, and the New Spirit of Capitalism

Poet and critic Jasper Bernes seeks nothing less than a complete reconsideration of poetry and art over the past 50 years in this book, which heralds the appearance of an important new voice in criticism.

Books

'Practicable' Proposes to Rewrite Postwar Western Art History

Both a historical survey and a theoretical treatise, this book highlights key artists and movements, of course, and then brings broader humanities and social science perspectives to bear.

Reviews

In Detroit They Come Out at Night

Grafitti artists, the jazz, punk, and hip-hop scenes, and the lonely mean streets of Detroit are captured by this survey of 13 photographers.

Reviews

Sun Ra: Astro Black, Cosmic Dark

Youngquist brings considerable skills to the life and work of the legendary but underappreciated and often misunderstood composer, keyboardist, and poet Sun Ra.

Reviews

'Remaking the Rust Belt', Remaking Society

This well-researched historical study examines how the Rust Belt cities of Pittsburgh and Hamilton, Ontario made the transition from the industrial to the postindustrial economy.

Books

Jonas Mekas Had the Right Attitude for Looking at Movies

For a decade and a half, Mekas covered experimental film for the Village Voice and was read by John Waters, Peter Bogdanovich, Jim Jarmusch, and countless others.

Books

From Rust Belt to Brain Belt: 'The Smartest Places on Earth'

An economist and a journalist report on how advances in technology and communication are helping once moribund industrial cities become hotspots for global innovation.

Books

Share and Share Alike, If We Dare

By 2050, two-thirds of the earth's population will live in cities. How can cities be smart and equitable in managing this growth?

Reviews

Coming of Age in Negroland

Pulitzer Prize-winning critic Margo Jefferson tells of her upbringing among Chicago's black upper crust in this meditation on race, class, and gender in America from mid-century on.

Books

The Art of the Game and the Game of Art

John Sharp's Works of Game: On the Aesthetics Games and Art doesn't argue whether games are art or not, but instead looks at the intersection where games and art meet.

Books

Minding the Gap of 'The Great Divide'

Nobel-prize winning economist Joseph Stiglitz examines the causes of economic inequality and proposes solutions in this compilation of essays.

Books

September 11, 2001, Is Said to Be the Most Photographed Disaster in History

9/11 and the Visual Culture of Disaster examines the tremulous memory effects of the destruction of the World Trade Center.

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University of Indiana Press


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