Film

Viewer Discretion Advised: 18 November, 2006

Remember Comic Relief? That superstar telethon-like comedy cavalcade typically hosted by Billy Crystal, Robin Williams and Whoopie Goldberg and centering on the charitable desire to help the homeless. Well, these now no longer funny joke tellers are back, and HBO is housing their latest lamentable effort. While the cause this time around is even more important – the still suffering victims of Hurricane Katrina – the concept seems so very, well, Reagan era. And wouldn't you know it, the event is celebrating its 20th Anniversary. Here's hoping our aged hosts leave most of the jesting to their far funnier modern contemporaries. Sarah Silverman or Lewis Black can run riffs around these aging icons from humor's hoary past. Oh yeah, and there's movies this weekend as well. A couple are really good. The rest are merely defendable. If you can pull yourself away from the random rib-tickling being offered elsewhere, you may actually find something enjoyable to watch on your favorite pay cable channels. And even if you don't support said washed up comedians, donate anyway. The cause is that important. For the record, the films offered for Saturday, 18 November are:

HBOAssault on Precinct 13

John Carpenter's take on Night of the Living Dead proved, way back in 1976, that there was more to this potentially great filmmaker than a crazy sci-fi comedy ('74's Dark Star). Sadly, this remake once again confirms that Mr. Halloween is one director's whose oeuvre should not be revisited (2005's Fog, anyone?). While many enjoyed the standard action film facets of the storyline, helmer Jean-François Richet's take on the substance is more videogame than viable. What could have been a brash update to the entire b-movie format from decades before ends up another over-stylized homage to the type of tedious thriller that more or less killed the genre in the first place. For those without Cinemax (where this film premiered previously), it's now your chance to be disappointed. (Premieres Sunday 19 November, 12:30am EST).

PopMatters Review

CinemaxCharlie and the Chocolate Factory*

Criminally underrated when it hit theaters -- mostly because of baby boomers lamenting the very thought of remaking the 1971 Gene Wilder “classic" – and frequently dismissed as an example of both artists' well known excesses, the immensely talented duo of Tim Burton and Johnny Depp deliver a fractured fairy tale for the glorified geek ages. For SE&L's scratch, this is what a Roald Dahl adaptation should be – exciting, mischievous and sitting just slightly over into the dark side. From the film’s incredible look to the emotionally satisfying backstory given to the creepy-cool character of Willy Wonka, this duo created an instant masterpiece. It will soon become the timeless family classic it so richly deserves to be. Take this opportunity to savor the flavor this cinematic confection offers, especially if you missed it the first time around over on HBO. (Saturday 18 November, 10:00pm EST).

PopMatters Review

StarzGlory Road

Ah, the inspirational sports movie. Hollywood just can't seem to get enough of these one-note exercises in cinematic cheerleading. In the case of this docudrama based on the 1966 Texas Western basketball team (the first all black squad in NCAA history to make it to the championship game) and its white coach Don Haskins, the introduction of race practically triples the sentimental stakes. Many have criticized the film for being historically and sociologically inaccurate, but most audiences have overlooked the flaws to find something of value in this otherwise routine effort. First time filmmaker James Gartner does a good job with this maudlin material, but it's hard to overcome the inherent issues in the narrative. Anytime ethnicity plays a part in the plotting, idealism tends to mar the overall entertainment elements. (Premieres Saturday 18 November, 9:00pm EST).

PopMatters Review

ShowTOOMe, You and Everyone We Know*

It was heavily tauted as one of 2005's best films, but like so many independent treasures tossed around at year's end, the lack of a continual major studio push has placed this miraculous motion picture directly on the cultural back burner. Miranda July, noted performance artist and first time filmmaker has yet to follow-up this critically acclaimed take on contemporary life, and some have started to question if she's merely a one hit wonder. Even if she never duplicates this sunny, satiric film's fresh and inventive vibe, she will still be the creator of one of the new millennium's most winning efforts. If you've never seen it, here's your non-DVD buying chance. If you have, it's time to take up artistic arms. A film this good doesn't deserve to be forgotten so quickly. (Saturday 18 November, 10:25pm EST)

PopMatters Review

ZOMBIES!

For those of you who still don't know it, Turner Classic Movies has started a new Friday night/Saturday morning feature entitled "The TCM Underground", a collection of cult and bad b-movies hosted by none other than rad rocker turned atrocity auteur Rob Zombie. From time to time, when SE&L feels Mr. Devil's Rejects is offering up something nice and sleazy, we will make sure to put you on notice. For 17/18 November, only one horrific hit deserves a mention:

Freaks (1931)

It was the movie that destroyed director Tod Browning's Hollywood career. It was the inspiration for the Ramones' classic punk rock catchphrase "Gabba-Gabba-Hey". But all ancillary issues aside, it is one of early motion picture's most shocking, and sensational, masterpieces. (2:00am EST)

The Cream of the Crop

In honor of IFC's month-long celebration of Janus Films, SE&L will skip the standard daily overview of what's on the other movie-based cable outlets and, instead, focus solely on what it and the Sundance Channel have to offer. Beyond that premise, however, we will still only concentrate on the best of the best, the most inspiring of the inspiring, the most meaningful of the…well, you get the idea. For the week of 18, November, here are our royal recommendations:

IFC: Every Tuesday in November is Janus Films night. For the 21st, the selections are:

Beauty and the Beast

Jean Cocteau's adaptation of the classic fairy tale is perhaps the most visually sumptuous and optically stunning monochrome motion picture ever made. Every frame is a fine masterwork come to life. (9PM EST)

Black Orpheus

This retelling of the "Orpheus and Eurydice" legend, set in Rio de Janeiro, is given a warm and sexy façade thanks to director Marcel Camus and the movie's crazed Carnaval backdrop. (10:35PM EST)

Alexander Nevsky

Sergei Eisenstein's pro-Stalin era propaganda piece, shrouded in the amazing music of Prokofiev, stands as a testament to the power of visuals and iconography, especially during wartime. (12:25AM EST)

Sundance Channel

19 November - To Kill a Mockingbird

Gregory Peck shines as sly Southern lawyer Atticus Finch in what still stands as the only legitimate adaptation of Harper Lee's literary masterpiece.

(3PM EST)

20 November - The Nomi Song

He remains one of the '80s most unusual and enigmatic icons. This delightful documentary by Andrew Horn does a great job of capture this musician's magic – and mania.

(1:15PM EST)

24 November -Bring Me The Head Of Alfredo Garcia

The late, great Warren Oates is electrifying in this fascinating fever dream of a movie director by the legendary iconoclastic auteur, Sam Peckinpah

(4PM EST)


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