Film

Viewer Discretion Advised: 21 October, 2006

Just turn off the set. Skip it. Go out and get a life, or find a local book club that will actually accept your multimedia made illiteracy as a personality quirk, but don't make a date with your beloved pay movie channels this weekend. With four films that stink like a dead skunk drowned in dung, it's impossible to recommend anything that your hard earned premium cable dollars are paying for. Between the tepid tripe of another paranormal romance to a ridiculous remake of a fright film that didn't get it right the first time around, you'd be better served by staying up late tonight and taking in a pair of Russ Meyer's mammary-enhanced masterworks (see below). Or better yet, turn off the tube and simply settle in with a good DVD. Even something as hackneyed as a full on Friday the 13th marathon (from the original to Freddy vs. Jason) would provide more moviemaking acumen than the dire dregs being tossed out here. For those of you still not convinced, here is what's showing this Saturday, 21 October:

HBOJust Like Heaven

Who knew the dead were so – spunky? In this tired retread of the ridiculous RomCom subsection – the supernatural love story, Reese Witherspoon is Legally Deceased, and yet still manages to woo and win the afterlife affection of her barely alive new beau, the ragged Mark Ruffalo. Though some might consider this approach to relationships (ghost of a dead doctor falls for the dude who rents out her now vacant apartment) as something quite novel, it's just the same old superficial spook show. If you want real invention in the tired filmic format, avoid this frazzled fluff and check out Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. Once you've seen how truly original and affecting a romantic comedy can be, you'll never again settle for such syrupy, saccharine slop. Here's hoping her recent Oscar win helps Ms. Witherspoon avoid such subpar product in the future. (Premieres Saturday 21 October, 8:00pm EST).

PopMatters Review

CinemaxStay

What has happened to the science fiction film of late? With examples as appalling as the Robin Williams waste of time The Final Cut to that lame Michael Bay boogie The Island, it seems like the speculative side of genre cinema just can't get no respect. Further proof is provided by this excruciating Ewan McGregor effort. Playing a psychiatrist trying to decipher the rationale behind a gifted artist's recent declaration of suicidal intent, this failed future schlock is all the more stunning when you consider Mark Foster, responsible for Monster's Ball and Finding Neverland, was behind this fiasco. Call it Imitation Vanilla Sky or a drab David Lynch daydream, but this meshing of fantasy with fact is just an excuse for more motion picture masturbation from what many consider to be a gifted filmmaker. (Premieres Saturday 21 October, 10:00pm EST).

PopMatters Review

StarzShopgirl

Steve Martin needs to retire. Just look at the last five films this one time cutting edge comedian has made – Bringing Down the House, Cheaper by the Dozen (and it's even dopier sequel), the pathetic Pink Panther revamp and this stab at middle aged male menopause passing itself off as a standard romantic comedy. Responsible for the script, as well as the source material at the center of this lame love triangle, Martin makes many of the same mistakes that other wannabe old coot Casanovas commit – he actually thinks people will care about his aged character's need for human companionship. With relationships too difficult for the average viewer to navigate successfully, the interpersonal dynamics of fictional people better be fresh or fascinating. Otherwise, it's all heartbreak and old hat. Sadly, Martin makes it seem rather rote as well. (Premieres Saturday 21 October, 9:00pm EST).

PopMatters Review

ShowtimeThe Amityville Horror (2005)

It was the book that spawned a dozen schoolyard debates. Hailed as a true, nonfiction account of one family's battle with the forces of darkness, the legend of Amityville (and the bestseller that resulted) fueled many a '70s teen's sleepless night. The original film version, starring James Brolin and Margot Kidder was marred by a blatant disregard for the narrative's best elements, and instead, focused on things that many fans found irritating, or downright foolish. Well, in a clear case of failing the second time around, producer Michael Bay equally eviscerates the storyline, keeping only the chills for this exercise in excess. First time filmmaker Andrew Douglas makes the fatal mistake of believing that non-stop scares make for a masterpiece of macabre. Instead, he churns out a meandering mess with various haunted house histrionics that appear to have no real point. (Saturday 21 October, 9:00pm EST)

PopMatters Review

ZOMBIES!

For those of you who still don't know it, Turner Classic Movies has started a new Friday night/Saturday morning feature entitled "The TCM Underground", a collection of cult and bad b-movies hosted by none other than rad rocker turned atrocity auteur Rob Zombie. From time to time, when SE&L feels Mr. Devil's Rejects is offering up something nice and sleazy, we will make sure to put you on notice. For 20/21 October, the choices are sensational:

Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill!

Russ Meyer's emblematic exploitation film is far more interested in violence than vice, but that doesn't mean its any less effective. With one of the best girl gangs ever put on film – including the sultry Tura Satana and the 'healthy' Haji – you can't beat this film for full out gal against guy gratuity. The result is a true cult gem. (2:00am EST)

Mudhoney

Made the same year as Pussycat, Meyer's trashy Tobacco Road take is far more typical of his overall canon – an oeuvre that was more social commentary than all out skin flick. Safely within the limits of acceptable mid-'60s censorship standards (it will be interesting to see how TNT handles the nudity), this is also one of the director's best. (3:30am EST)

Seven Films, Seven Days

For October, the off title idea is simple – pick a different cable channel each and every day, and then find a film worth watching. While it sounds a little like an exercise in entertainment archeology, you'd be surprised at the broad range of potential motion picture repasts in the offing. Therefore, the fourth installment of acceptable selections for this week include:

21 October - The Game

David Fincher fooled everyone by showing that the tired twist ending could still be surprising – and thought provoking – in this inventive clockwork thriller.

(Flix – 8PM EST)

22 October - Dolores Claiborne

Kathy Bates takes on another classic Stephen King character in Taylor Hackford's excellent adaptation of the terror maestro's experimental novel.

(Encore Mystery – 9:30PM EST)

23 October - Halloween II (Edited Version)

Edit out all the blood and guts and what do you have? Another American Movie Classics excuse for entertainment – not that this shoddy sequel needs help sucking.

(AMC – 8PM EST)

24 October -Leviathan

Right at the end of the '80s, sea creatures made a minor run at genre box office gold. The better of the two is this combination of Alien and aquatics.

(Encore – 8PM EST)

25 October - The Haunting

Want to see the film that killed Jan de Bont's directorial career? Then check out this overwrought, CGI heavy version of the Shirley Jackson classic.

(TBS – 11:20PM EST)

26 October - Better Off Dead

Considered by many '80s film fans as one of the era's definitive teen romps, this jaunty John Cusak starring vehicle deserves all of its aficionado affections.

(The Movie Channel – 11:35PM EST)

27 October -Strange Invaders

Both a throwback to the sci-fi of the '50s and a celebration of the F/X heavy horrors of the '80s, this forgotten film is a true forgotten classic.

(MoviePlex – 7:20PM EST)

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