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Film

Viewer Discretion Advised: 26 May, 2007

It's another of those infamous long holiday weekends, meaning no one is really thinking about sitting in front of their television screens. Want proof? Look at the lame offerings being premiered this week on the pay cable channels. While one film is from 2005, the other three are lesser entries in 2006's cinematic sweepstakes. Not quite up to SE&L's leisure time liking. If, however, you enjoy half-baked horror, a stilted dance-based drama, and the kind of 3D animation that's actually killing the genre, then make sure to include Saturday's selections as part of your three days of rest and relaxation. Of course, many of you can't care. You will be braving the sell-out crowds to witness the last piece of the Pirates of the Caribbean puzzle. Here's a hint – wait until next week. If you want to be aggravated while trying to have some motion picture fun, you can sit at home and enjoy any of the irritating entries here, including SE&L's reluctant 26 May selection:

Premiere Pick

Over the Hedge

Need further proof that computer animation has more or less run its course after only a decade and a half as a vital cinematic art form? Take a gander at this demographically correct quasi-comedy and decide for yourself. Guilty of each and every cinematic pitfall that currently plagues the genre (stunt voice casting, overly simplistic storyline, far too many puerile pop culture references), this sometimes clever take on suburban sprawl and the many facets of friendship just can’t overcome its highly commercialized gloss. Unlike Pixar films that always seem to find the proper note between precocious and perfection, Hedge (based on a far cleverer comic strip by Michael Fry and T Lewis) appears designed deliberately to force Moms and Dads to dig deep into their pockets for endless items of tie-in merchandising. While not as bad as Open Season or Barnyard, this CGI candy is decidedly sour. (26 May, HBO, 8PM EST)

Additional Choices

Final Destination 3

A lot of critics pick on this clever horror franchise, and it's really unfair. Though they do tend to push the limits of logic and believability, all three films deliver lots of gooey gore goodness – this merely average offering no exception. While theatrical audiences may be growing tired of this series' tricks, there are dozens of direct to DVD delights still left in this creepshow concept. (26 May, Cinemax, 10PM EST)

Step Up

It's your typical teen coming of age angst-fest. Nora Clark's a budding dancer at the Maryland School of the Arts. Bad boy Tyler Gage is a delinquent sent to do some court-ordered community service at the institution. Lust blossoms as snobbery substitutes for storytelling in this star crossed lover's lament. Toss in some youth oriented street dancing, and you've got one dull drama. (26 May, Starz, 9PM EST)

Lord of War

Nicholas Cage has been on a weird career bender as of late. For every oddball acting choice (Ghost Rider, Next, The Wicker Man), he's shown up in unexpected cinematic places like this. As an arms dealer facing a moral crisis in Andrew Niccol's (Gattaca) forgotten film, he's mesmerizing. Our filmmaker is no slouch either, bringing a gutsy authenticity to this spellbinding material. (26 May, Showtime, 11:15PM EST)

Indie Pick

The Filth and the Fury

The Sex Pistols' saga is a sad one, indeed. It's a tale about greed and gullibility, ego and excess, infinite possibilities and eventual implosion. The legend is laced with inaccuracies, fan fictions, and several outright lies. It seemed that individuals saddened over the band's lack of lasting respect would never get the straight story – that is, until longtime associate Julian Temple decided to make a documentary about them. Allowing the remaining members to speak for themselves while contextualizing their rapid rise and unnecessary fall, the results are truly astounding. Temple salvages the sonic significance they still carry, while explaining all the fairytale fables surrounding their myth. In addition, he solidifies the Pistols' place as one of the all time great rock and roll rebellions. Only meaningless manager Malcolm McLaren comes up short – and when all is said and done, that's how it should be. (30 May, IFC, 11PM EST)

Additional Choices

American Graffiti

Remember the days when George Lucas wasn't an egomaniacal misfit retrofitting his Star Wars movies with more and more pointless digital effects? Right, neither do we. Maybe this blast from the past, the last legitimate major motion picture the intergalactic geek ever directed, will fresh our memory. It couldn't hurt – not like the pain he's been inflicting on us for the last 20 years. (26 May, Sundance, 10PM EST)

8½ Women

It used to be, when film fans noted the experimental directors who really mattered, Peter Greenaway (The Cook, The Thief, His Wife and Her Lover) was high on everyone's list. Now he's a humorous afterthought, disappearing from the scholarly radar long before this eccentric combination of sex for sale and Fellini's famous film. It’s worth a look, if only to see how the avant-garde treads wasted opportunity waters. (29 May, IFC, 9PM EST)

Down to the Bone

Back in 2004, everyone at Sundance was talking about this amazing independent drama revolving around a mother desperate to hide her drug habit from her family. Winning awards for Vera Farmiga's brilliant lead performance, and director Debra Granik's deft handling, it went on to simply fade away. Now's your chance to catch up with this lo-fi look at how secrets can literally destroy a person. (31 May, Sundance, 10PM EST)

Outsider Option

Once Upon a Time in the West

Here it is – the greatest horse opera of all time. Though many might balk at such a statement, there is no denying the visual power and narrative potency of Sergio Leone's ultimate spaghetti Western. Featuring Henry Fonda as a cold-eyed killer, Charles Bronson as a well-meaning mercenary, and Claudia Cardinale as the sexiest frontier woman ever, the famed Italian auteur created a masterpiece so mannered and stylized that you could almost count the individual frames used to deliver each decisive moment. Long celebrated for how it deconstructed the mythical American West as well as its strength of story and character, classic filmmaking really doesn't get any better than this. If you don't already own the definite two disc DVD of this cinematic landmark, here's your opportunity to see what you're missing. (29 May, Turner Classic Movies, 10PM EST)

Additional Choices

The Old Dark House

Skip the repeat of Freaks. Avoid the pointless Mark of the Vampire. Instead, stay up to see James Whale's definitive take on the haunted house movie. With remarkable turns by Boris Karloff and Ernest Thesinger, there are not a lot of fear factors here. But the mood will more than make up for the lack of legitimate scares. (25 May, Turner Classic Movies, 4:45AM EST)

Bad Moon

Eric Red road the original hype from his screenplay for The Hitcher (1986) to a stint as b-movie's scribe in residence. After Near Dark and Blue Steel, he finally got a shot behind the camera. The result was this unique take on the werewolf genre. Instead of going strictly for gore, Red attempts something more metaphysical. He almost gets there. (28 May, Encore, 3:30AM EST)

Kiss Me Quick

It's the birth of the Nudie Cutie as us exploitation fans know (and love) it. Harry Novak's decision to move bare bodkins from the censorship safe nudist camps and into more comical settings turned the entire industry upside down. Now, thanks to the Great White North's favorite grindhouse channel, we can re-experience the risqué naiveté all over again. (29 May, Drive In Classics, Canada, 2:45AM EST)

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