The Best Metal of 2016

by Adrien Begrand

2 December 2016

Adrien Begrand celebrates the best heavy metal of the year in all of its thrilling diversity.
 


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Voivod

Post Society

(Century Media)

Review [23.Feb.2016]

20

Voivod
Post Society

The first release since the departure of original bassist Jean-Yves “Blacky” Therieault, this 30-minute EP by the Canadian progressive metal innovators proves, once again, that they’re still full of ideas. Alternately echoing the idiosyncrasy of classic albums Dimension Hatross and Nothingface and the d-beat speed of Discharge and Motörhead, the foursome tear through five blistering tracks, highlighted by the epic “We Are Connected”—featuring some phenomenal guitar work by Dan “Chewy” Mongrain—and the unabashedly joyous and creative cover of Hawkwind’s “Silver Machine”.

 

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Oceans of Slumber

Winter

(Century Media)

19

Oceans of Slumber
Winter

Featuring powerhouse singer Cammie Gilbert, Houston’s Oceans of Slumber delivered a stunning debut album with Century Media Records, one that delves into the more progressive side of extreme metal with astonishing discipline and song craft. Like the Gathering and Witch Mountain, the band puts an original spin on what defines heavy metal singing, as Gilbert creates a wonderful dynamic between strong, forceful vocals and a more sensitive side. The end result is a progressive doom album with heart, whether on the stunning title track or the daring, haunting cover of the Moody Blues’ “Nights in White Satin”.

 

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Gorguts

Pleiades’ Dust

(Season of Mist)

18

Gorguts
Pleiades’ Dust

In a year where much of death metal spun its wheels, Canada’s great Gorguts continued to show incredible breadth and creativity in 2016. Arriving on the heels of 2013’s landmark Colored Sands, the spellbinding 33-minute composition “Pleiades’ Dust” continues Luc Lemay’s career-long experimentation with melody and atonality within death metal. Again, he has been aided by bassist Colin Marston and guitarist Kevin Hufnagel—as members of Disrhythmia they are no slouches themselves—and along with drummer Patrice Hamelin the foursome crate an ebb and flow over half an hour that shows, like so few in the genre have dome as of late, just how much range this harsh form of music can have.

 

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Vektor

Terminal Redux

(Earache)

17

Vektor
Terminal Redux

Easily one of the most wildly inventive new bands of the last five years, Arizona’s Vektor are evolving at a rate that often seems dizzying, putting a unique spin on thrash metal. At the same time, though, that ambition and boundless energy had led to a pair of very busy albums that would benefit from a little editing. However, just like 2011’s Outer Isolation, the 73-minute Terminal Redux is impossible not to admire. Little hints of 1980s thrash are scattered throughout, the virtuosic musicianship echoing the likes of Sacrifice, Voivod, and Annihilator, but coupled with the beauty-in-chaos style of Chuck Schuldiner of Death, the band catapults a rigid sound into the 21st century, sounding vibrant and highly original.

 

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Oranssi Pazuzu

Värähtelijä

(20 Buck Spin)

16

Oranssi Pazuzu
Värähtelijä

Three years after the revelatory Valonielu, Finnish avant-garde stalwarts Oranssi Pazuzu continue their exploration of spacey, psychedelic, and krautrock-inspired sounds within the confines of heavy metal. What they’ve always done so well is use black metal as a springboard towards other, less restricting experimental sounds, and that combination of trebly black metal riffs with jazz fusion freakout guitar solos, Hammond organ, and oddball time signatures makes this new album, whose title roughly translates as “resonator”, a marvel from start to finish.

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