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Homeboy Sandman – “Life Support” (Singles Going Steady)

Here's hoping Homeboy Sandman makes art as amazing as "Life Support" for years to come.

Emmanuel Elone: On first listen, Homeboy Sandman can seem dull. The piano beat, though pretty, is unassuming, and Sandman’s flow and voice do not command much attention. However, under his slow, deceptively simply rhymes are some exemplary lyrical poetry, such as “I want shoulders like Atlas / Then I want to extract all the theatrics.” The hook is just as emotive, with the refrain “If I stop making art then I’ll die.” Hearing how well-crafted and delicate both the production and lyricism on this song is, I do believe that he takes his art that seriously, and hope he continues to make art that’s as amazing as “Life Support” for years to come. [8/10]

Chris Ingalls: Great rhyming, with a music track that imbues a low-key approach. The piano and analog synth washes help create a retro atmosphere. Sometimes, to make a point, it’s perfectly fine to keep it hushed and quiet. “If I stop making art, then I’ll die.” Amen. [7/10]

Pryor Stroud: Tossed across an agile, carefree piano loop, Homeboy Sandman’s “Life Support” is an exemplary instance of flow at its most casual, effortless, and intuitively crafted. However, its prevailing easygoingness seems to contravene the severity of its central thematic. Sandman underlines the necessity of art, particularly hip-hop, to his well-being — “If I stop making art, then I’ll die” — but the production is too laid-back, and the vocal too measuredly adrift, to convince you that this life is really in need of the support it calls for. [5/10]

Chad Miller: The music is absolutely perfect. Sandman’s flow is difficult to predict on occasion, and it makes the music more exciting. The lyrics are decently appealing as well. The line “If I stop making art then I’ll die” really gripped me on first listen, but unfortunately every time he repeats it, the value of the line seems to diminish. [7/10]

SCORE: 6.75

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