Handful of Luvin'

Life in Between

by David Maine

25 October 2010

 

Restless band records lively songs, for the most part

cover art

Handful of Luvin'

Life In Between

(Self-released)
US: 30 Jan 2010
UK: Import

Handful of Luvin’ is a chameleon of a band, shape-shifting from reggae-rock to countryesque to folkie on consecutive tracks of their third CD, Life In Between. The country tinge is the most convincing, as on the explosive, galloping “There’s No Right, There’s No Wrong”, but the midtempo reggae ‘n’ roll of opener “Born Lucky” and “Kickdrum” has its own visceral appeal. Instrumentation follows the standard four-piece template—often substituting Andrew Joslyn’s violin for keyboards—but judicious use of other sounds like trumpet and clarinet prevent things from settling into predictability. David John’s expressive vocals add punch, too. The album loses steam when in singer-songwriter mode, which tends to be downtempo and dull, but for every clunker like “Washington” or “Lazy Men”, there’s a much more rewarding “Treaty” or “Bomb Bomb” right around the corner. And penultimate track “Harry Met Rona” is just a straight-up Irish reel, electrified, à la Fairport Convention. What was that about chameleons again?

Life In Between

Rating:

 

We all know how critical it is to keep independent voices alive and strong online. Please consider a donation to support our work as an independent publisher devoted to the arts and humanities. Your donation will help PopMatters stay viable through these changing and challenging times where advertising no longer covers our costs. We need your help to keep PopMatters publishing. Thank you.

 


//comments
//Mixed media
//Blogs

20 Questions: Nashville Singer-Songwriter Natalie Hemby

// Sound Affects

"Natalie Hemby's Puxico is a standout debut from a songwriter who has been behind the scenes for over a decade.

READ the article