Reed Turchi - "Everybody's Waiting" (audio) (premiere)

by Sarah Zupko

5 February 2016

Blues rocker Reed Turchi steps outside his band TURCHI for a solo turn that shows off his musical influences, including Randy Newman, JJ Cale, and T Rex.
Photo: Carson Ellis 

Blues rocker Reed Turchi steps outside his band TURCHI for a solo turn that shows off his musical influences, including Randy Newman, JJ Cale, and T Rex. Speaking in Shadows dials back the blues a bit and gets some Memphis soul grooves going that lend these songs a funky quality. Case in point is “Everybody’s Waiting”, a tune that shows off those Newman touches with its relaxed, pop/soul vibe. Despite the upbeat melody and beats, the song has some serious undertones.
  
Turchi tells PopMatters that “‘Everybody’s Waiting’ is about the kind of apocalyptic paranoia that seems to be a pillar of the modern condition, though maybe obsessing over the destruction of humanity has always been a part of being human. Thankfully, this song celebrates the insanity of ‘grab life by the burger’ and late night adds for zombie-survival knives with the incredible saxophone of Art Edmaiston, and some wacky synth and percussion from Billy Bennett, who engineered MGMT’s Congratulations. Paul Taylor, Memphis’ finest Swiss-army-knife studio man, lays down the groove. It’s a song we can all dance to as we await the end of the world… again… and again… and yet again…”

Reed Turchi‘s Speaking in Shadows releases March 4th via Devil Down Records.

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