Chuck & Albert

Énergie

by Deanne Sole

18 January 2010

 
cover art

Chuck & Albert

Énergie

(Self-Released)
US: 29 Sep 2009
UK: Import

“Il Était Une Bergère” flirts with a tune that English-speaking listeners will probably identify as “Turkey in the Straw”, and if you want to imagine the spirit of Énergie in a nutshell, then think of that with breezy French overtones. This is Acadian country music, all leaping, fiddling, whooping, harmonica, spoons, chicken noises (“Set à Mon Père”), and high-spirited toes a-tapping that only pauses in “La Fièvre” to show off some serious fiddling. Overall, there’s much glee, some guitar, and vocal repartee. Somewhere outside the album, partners are being spun and swung. Chuck and Albert Arsenault have worked the live circuit for years, and they play like men who see an impatient audience seeking an opportunity to dance. This distinguishes them from contemporaries who prefer their folk a little more formal, Le Vent du Nord, for example. The tunes are traditional ones, collected by a walking encyclopedia of a Prince Edward Islander named Georges and adopted and played with enthusiasm.

Énergie

Rating:

We all know how critical it is to keep independent voices alive and strong on the Internet. Please consider a donation to support our work. We are a wholly independent, women-owned, small company. Your donation will help PopMatters stay viable through these changing, challenging times where costs have risen and advertising has dropped precipitously. PopMatters needs your help to keep publishing. Thank you.


//comments
//Mixed media
//Blogs

20 Questions: Kasey Chambers

// Sound Affects

"Australia's country great Kasey Chambers embraced her ambition on a new double-album, but still wants to be remembered as "being real in a very fake world."

READ the article