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Television

Shaun Evans, aka DS Endeavour Morse, on the Economy of the Gesture in Storytelling

When Shaun Evans was recruited to play young Morse, he had been acting for over ten years, yet it's Endeavour that's likely his magnum opus. In this interview, he discusses the defining work that not only allowed his acting talent to blossom but also nurtured his natural storytelling ability.

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Reviews

'Sherlock' Season Four: The Russian Roulette of Relationships

Sherlock Holmes is tempted, tortured, and tested -- all in the name of love.

Television

'The Crimson Field' Addresses War and the Changing Roles of Women

The Crimson Field may not completely enthrall but it is consistently interesting. For a show without grand ambition, you can say much worse.

Reviews

'Austin City Limits' On a Pedestal

Austin City Limits has defined how music is experienced through television for 40 years. This is a look back at a cultural institution that has always pushed forward.

Film

What Drives the Brave Journalists in 'Reportero'?

Reportero is a must-see documentary that forcefully demonstrates the importance of the press.

Reviews

'Sherlock' and the Case of the Changing, Challenging Identities

The third season of Sherlock becomes much more meta and challenges the very concept of who Sherlock Holmes is, and suggests change is indeed in the (east) wind.

Reviews

Can Technology Stop the Next Attack?

NOVA remains a great series and so even an installment such as Manhunt: Boston Bombers, where we begin to feel like we've read it or heard it or seen it all before, can hold our interest, albeit tentatively.

Reviews

The (Un)Making of the English Aristocracy: 'Downton Abbey: Season 3'

Downton Abbey might not necessarily represent a perfect world, but it does assert a knowable one, and this provides refuge from the uncertainties that plague us in our everyday lives.

Reviews

A Modern Allegory: 'The Dust Bowl: A Film by Ken Burns'

Consider The Dust Bowl's historic backdrop: an economic bubble, a financial crisis, a drought, a natural disaster, and the effects of human activity on the climate.

Reviews

'Nova: Secrets of the Viking Sword' Makes a Point

Renaissance martial arts expert John Clements slashes through tomatoes and pumpkins, not to mention a pair of two-liter water bottles, a basketball, an ice block, a side of beef and a number of rugs.

Reviews

'Death and the Civil War' Is an Excellent Account of How America Learned to Handle Death

A vivid adaptation of Drew Gilpin Faust’s acclaimed book This Republic of Suffering, this nearly two-hour documentary is among the best of its kind.

Television

Thursdays This Fall: An Early TV Preview

FOX’s American Idol, the current highest rated show on TV, will still hold a Thursday night spot when it returns in January, but the season starts off with the less-popular X Factor.

Reviews

Finding Resolution to 'The Mystery of Edwin Drood'

Writer Gwyneth Hughes gallantly strives to solve the biggest mystery of Charles Dickens' Edwin Drood: how it ends.

Reviews

Margaret Mitchell: American Rebel

Gone With The Wind is one of the most popular books ever published. More than 75 years after its publication, neither it nor its author are above controversy.

Television

Tea with 'Sherlock': Investigating the Investigators

BBC's Sherlock has crossed the pond for the second time to find a lively, if not exactly raging, fanbase waiting. Why is it now that the idea of a reinventing Sherlock Holmes is suddenly so alluring?

Natalia Kutsepova
Film

PBS Launches First Annual Film Festival, Hosted by Comic Duo the National Film Society

Ever wondered where other art house films go to premiere if not the big names like Cannes or Sundance or Toronto? Well, starting this year, PBS is hoping to be among those jumping off points.

Reviews

'These Amazing Shadows': On Overcoming the Perils of Being Loved to Death

These Amazing Shadows is most compelling when it bathes in the nostalgic recollections of celebrated filmmakers.

Television

Your Virtual Fall TV Preview: Thursdays

Part four of a primetime look at what the major networks will be offering us, with predictions on what will stick and what will flop.

Music

The Year in Music: December 2010

Continuing our look at the year’s most notable events in the world of music, here’s what happened in December 2010.

Television

The Year in TV: December 2010

Continuing our look at the year’s most notable television events, here’s what happened in December 2010.

Television

The Year in TV: October 2010

Continuing our look at the year’s most notable television events, here’s what happened in October 2010.

Television

The Year in TV: September 2010

Continuing out look at the year’s most notable television events, here’s what happened in September 2010.

Events

The Year in TV: August 2010

Continuing out look at the year’s most notable television events, here’s what happened in August 2010.

Television

The Year in TV: July 2010

Continuing out look at the year’s most notable television events, here’s what happened in July 2010.

Television

It's Technology, My Dear Watson: Sherlock for the 21st Century

The famous detective now texts and surfs the net while Watson writes a blog. This is not your mother's Sherlock Holmes.

Reviews

Agatha Christie's Poirot: The Movie Collection, Set 5

In this collection of the latest Agatha Christie mysteries, everything is worth seeing, but the unorthodox adaptation of Murder on the Orient Express stands head and shoulders above the rest.

Events

On TV This Week: Paul McCartney and the PBS Special with a Long Title

As a fan of both Paul McCartney and the Beatles, I heard quite a bit about this special, and had low expectations. The event seemed focus too much on itself and its guests instead of the real reason they were there.

Reviews

Postwar Intrigue Continues to Please in 'Foyle's War'

In a disarming leitmotif for this series, characters are forever turning to one another following some revelation or disappointment and wondering, “But isn’t that what we were supposed to have been fighting to end?”

Reviews

Ian McKellen: Acting Shakespeare

For anyone who appreciates acting this is highly recommended; for anyone studying acting, it's essential. If everything this educational was this entertaining, everyone in the world would have a Ph.D.

Reviews

The Shape of the World

The history of cartography is, in a close to literal sense, the history of the entire world, and it is this fact that finds this documentary covering an amount of territory that is ultimately too big.

Television

America at a Crossroads: The Mosque in Morgantown

The Mosque in Morgantown focuses on debates within an American Muslim community, as this involves a range of individuals and beliefs.

Television

Independent Lens: Stranded: I've Come From a Plane That Crashed in the Mountains

In Stranded: I've Come From a Plane That Crashed in the Mountains, impressionistic reenactments don’t provide plot or solicit viewer sympathy so much as they evoke anxiety.

Television

Frontline: Sick Around America

Sick Around America outlines the health care system, and its many contradictions.

Television

Independent Lens: Tulia, Texas

As Tulia, Texas follows the many turns of the Drug Task Force case, from the initial convictions to investigations of undercover agent Tom Coleman, it becomes a cautionary tale.


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