The Chairman Dances - "Dorothy Day and Peter Maurin" (audio) (premiere)

by Will Rivitz

22 July 2016

It’s the kind of spirited indie rock lazy music writers describe without fail as “jangly,” shimmering verses dropping into a dusty, stomping chorus reminiscent of the wandering rock of Springsteen and Darnielle.
 

The Chairman Dances’ “Dorothy Day and Peter Maurin” is — as only a song with that kind of title can be — a quietly fervent chronicle of the lives of the titular Catholic activists. It’s the kind of spirited indie rock lazy music writers describe without fail as “jangly”, shimmering verses dropping into a dusty, stomping chorus reminiscent of the wandering rock of Springsteen and Darnielle. Lyrically, it continues in the tradition of the aforementioned artists as well — it’s less a treatise than a scene, reflective and illustrative above all. It’s the kind of eternal indie rock which will survive as long as the guitar stays in style — and, given how well the song fits into this canon and how good the canon as a whole is, this is a fine thing.
  
“Three years ago, when I first met my now wife, we exchanged books. I lent her Marilynne Robinson’s Gilead, my wife countered with Dorothy Day’s wonderfully wrought (and equally wonderfully titled) autobiography, The Long Loneliness,” explains lead singer Dan Comly. “What struck me most in those pages was the friendship between Dorothy and Peter Maurin. Dorothy was going through an especially dark time when the two met. Peter arrived out of thin air, said he wanted to start a newspaper. That meeting changed both their lives, and the success and influence that followed was no less miraculous.”

Time Without Measure is out August 26 via Black Rd Records. Preorder it here.

We all know how critical it is to keep independent voices alive and strong on the Internet. Please consider a donation to support our work. We are a wholly independent, women-owned, small company. Your donation will help PopMatters stay viable through these changing, challenging times where costs have risen and advertising has dropped precipitously. PopMatters needs your help to keep publishing. Thank you.


//comments
//Mixed media
//Blogs

TIFF 2017: 'The Shape of Water'

// Notes from the Road

"The Shape of Water comes off as uninformed political correctness, which is more detrimental to its cause than it is progressive.

READ the article