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The Road to Murder in Love and War: Three Films from Claude Chabrol

The character's in Claude Chabrol's The Third Lover, Line of Demarcation, and The Champagne Murders are obsessively doubled and mirrored, reflecting and refracting their hunger for sex, love, money, and power.

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Culture

Sex! Drugs! Volleyball! Dark Secrets of American Morality EXPOSED in Exploitation Films

Kino Lorber's Forbidden Fruit: The Golden Age of the Exploitation Picture series highlights exploitation films that aim to strike a blow for truth and health against censorship and narrow fuddy-duddies.

Film

England's Postwar Paranoia Creeps in the Shadows of Three Film-Noirs

Something portentous comes out of quiet ordinary postwar English life: three schizoid noirs from directors Carol Reed, Roy and John Boulting, and Tharold Dickinson.

Books

On the Socially Conscious Filmmaker, Sidney Lumet

Maura Spiegel's biography provides a thorough and compelling look at the life and films of the progressive New York icon filmmaker, Sidney Lumet.

Film

Cue the Music: 'Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2'

James Gunn crafts a deeply flawed film, but Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2, which digs deep into daddy issues, is still entertaining, visually gorgeous, and likable.

Film

'The Douglas MacLean Collection' Pokes Fun at Our Love of Clam, Cabbage, and Kale*

The bamboozle is on in silent films One a Minute and Bell Boy 13, starring comic actor Douglas MacLean.

Film

Jerry Hopper's 'Naked Alibi' Draws Comparisons to Douglas Sirk's Films

Although it's fair to state that Jerry Hopper is no Douglas Sirk, it's also true that their careers tangoed around each other, as seen in Hopper's Naked Alibi.

Film

Bang for Your Buck: Sergio Leone's 'A Fistful of Dynamite'

A Fistful of Dynamite finds Sergio Leone working on a massive canvas of intricately choreographed scenes that telegraph the chaos and the brutality of the Mexican Revolution.

Film

James Mangold's ​'Logan​' Depicts Wolverine's Worst Nightmare

In Mangold's Logan, an elderly, sick surrogate father and a young, estranged, emotionally-scarred "daughter" come to rely entirely on the aged Wolverine who is now but a haunted, battered, suicidal husk. It's nothing like superhero films that came before.

Film

'Doctor Strange': It's About Time

Scott Derrickson's Doctor Strange is a surprisingly cerebral, emotionally relatable film. It's also wrapped in some of the most exciting and unique blockbuster visuals seen in years.

Film

In Appreciation of Camille Billops and Her Films

Camille Billops moved beyond predictable and well-tread ground to open up space for new narratives in her films—about Black families, Black women, and Black middle-class life—that pulled on her distinctive and unapologetic worldview.

Film

John Badham's 'Dracula', the Rock Star

On John Badham's Dracula. Because the director of Saturday Night Fever is the first person you would think of to direct Dracula, right?

Film

There'll Always Be An Ealing: Postwar England's Little Studio That Could -- and Did

The Ealing name has been revived in the new century, but film buffs will always regard its incandescent era as that period when it held up a scrappy and schizoid mirror to postwar England's depressions and aspirations.

Books

Sam Wasson's 'The Big Goodbye' Puts Roman Polanski's 'Chinatown' in Its Place

Social historian Sam Wasson's The Big Goodbye: Chinatown and the Last Years of Hollywood, is a graceful and compelling elegy to both Roman Polanski's landmark film, and the end times of old Hollywood.

Books

What's So Great About Dennis Hopper's 'Easy Rider'?

Steven Bingen's Easy Rider: 50 Years Looking for America makes clear that he thinks Dennis Hopper's Easy Rider is a great film and it's not for the critics to decide.

Film

Deadpool and Ryan Reynolds' 11-Year Love Affair

If the best measure of success for a comic book film is how well it captures the tone for the central character, then Ryan Reynold's beloved character in Deadpool makes it among the greatest superhero films of all time.

Film

Tarantino Descends to the 9th Circle in 'Once Upon a Time...In Hollywood'

Once Upon a Time...In Hollywood is the clearest signal yet of Quentin Tarantino's transition from creative referentialist to repeat offender, standing somewhere between revisionism and recidivism.

Film

Brilliant Moral Science - and Dinosaurs -- from the Yeaworth-Harris Trilogy!

From the makers of The Blob, Irvin S. Yeaworth, Jr .and Jack H. Harris, 4D Man and Dinosaurus! (restored by Kino Lorber) give film fans a can't-look-away sci-fi gaze into the victims of progress.

Film

How Kenneth Anger Created Camp Cinema with His Short Film, 'Puce Moment'

With his 1949 avant-garde short film, Puce Moment, Kenneth Anger is vomiting glamour into our face, objectifying objects, sexualizing what cannot, in a vacuum, be sexualized: silk, velvet, cotton, glitter -- and we cannot get enough of it.

Film

Joss Whedon's '​Avengers: Age of Ultron' Ages Well

Joss Whedon defied expectations with his ambitiously muted, psychological approach to Avengers: Age of Ultron but despite his best intentions and genuinely interesting vision, this would be his only effort with Marvel Studios. It was a good effort.

Film

Cinema of Revelation: 'Minute Bodies' Peers into F. Percy Smith's Legacy

There's some mystery about the quietly conscientious artist and pioneer F. Percy Smith, and Minute Bodies can't penetrate it as easily as he revealed the hidden life of plants.

Film

The Rise and Fall of Female Silent Filmmakers

Filmmaking was only one element of a much wider feminist movement that was manifesting itself in various forms, from the flapper to the suffragette to the birth control advocate to the bohemian female writer and political activist.

Books

'The Ultimate History of the '80s Teen Movie': It's More Than Just the Brat Pack

A quiet revolution of women in the film industry, the rise of home video -- The Ultimate History of the '80s Teen Movie is about more than just Saturday Night Fever and The Breakfast Club.

Film

'What Price Hollywood?' and the Birth of the 'Star Is Born' Films

The A Star is Born films have been born, re-born, and born again for almost a century, making them part of America's cultural fabric. Here's a look at how it all started.

Books

We Are All Part of the Patriarchy: 'Space Sirens, Scientists and Princesses'

In Conrad's significant project of tracking the representations of women in sci-fi cinema, he's mindful of his subjectivity.

Film

Dignity and the Death Penalty: On Borzage’s 'Moonrise'

In the nearly eight decades since Moonrise's release, Borzage's melodrama-noir styled meditations on social causality, dignity, and redemption have lost none of their potency.

Books

Populism as High Art: Getting to the Heart of Ishiro Honda

A new biography of the groundbreaking -- yet unassuming -- film director explores his multifaceted life and work.

Books

Film History 'Nobody’s Girl Friday' Is a Wise Counterpoint to the "Great Man" Auteur Theory

We've always been aware that films are not immaculately created. Smyth's work is a meticulously researched history of how women entered, developed, sustained, and grew within the Hollywood dream factory.

Books

'We’ll Always Have Casablanca'

Even if you don't agree with Umberto Eco that "Casablanca is not one movie; it is 'movies'," you can still learn a lot by reading Isenberg's book and have a great time in the process.

Books

'Agnès Varda between Film, Photography and Art'

When we objectify Agnès Varda as a "harmless granny" in pop culture, we lose perspective of her important work. DeRoo's book works toward rectifying this.

Books

'Pink Slipped', a Study of Women Working in Silent Film, Questions the Source

Film history is re-written both deliberately and inadvertently, and so the consideration of it as "fact" becomes tricky, as Jane Gaines' work reveals.

Books

'Becoming AFI' Might Have Benefited from a Good Scriptwriter's Input

The history of this important American cultural institution is vital and appreciated, of course. If only the text had more "life" and "color" in it, as a good film does.

Film

Jean-Pierre Melville’s 'Le Samouraï' Plays with the Perils of the Loner

Under the lens of cultural and historical context, as well as understanding the reflective nature of popular culture, it's hard not to read this film as a cautionary tale about the limitations of isolationism.

Books

'It's the Pictures That Got Small' Tells of Hollywood's Golden Age Like Only a Diary Can

Charles Backett's diaries provide readers with a close and very personal look at the genius of Billy Wilder and a glance at nearly every other Hollywood big-wig of the Golden Age.

Reviews

Iris Barry Gave so Much to the World

Lady in the Dark is a meticulously researched, lovingly written book that suggests Iris Barry’s passions and accomplishments extend beyond the realm of cinema.

Reviews

Sentimentality, Captured Beautifully: 'Wartime Kiss: Visions of the Moment in the 1940s'

We’re meant to understand something more about our ability to respond to the images around us. We’re shaped emotionally by images, and new, unconventional readings of history can be enriched by mining through them.

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