Music

The Best Progressive Rock/Metal of 2018

This year provided introspective appreciation for creators and listeners alike for the sights and sounds of progressive music, as well as the more universal yet personal hardships and growths we all face.

If there's one word to define progressive rock and metal this year, it's "survival". In a sense, this relates to groups retaining relevancy and quality—if not outdoing themselves entirely—after having very lengthy hiatuses and/or decades of fine work already behind them. Likewise, 2018 saw creators coming back strong after facing losses not only immediate and seemingly insurmountable but also lingering from the distant past. Thus, the music provided introspective appreciation for creators and listeners alike for the sights and sounds of the subgenres, as well as the more universal yet personal hardships and growths we all face.

As always, narrowing down our top choices was no easy task. While artists like Coheed and Cambria, Southern Empire, Ihsahn, TesseracT, Nosound, Kino, the Tangent, the Sea Within, Roine Stolt, Lynchgate, Rivers of Nihil, Kindo, the Ocean, Tiger Moth Tales, A Perfect Circle, Distorted Harmony, and the Pineapple Thief issued exceptional work, the following ten releases represent what impacted us most. (It's important to remember that this list only signifies the best of what we've caught; no one can hear everything, so feel free to let us know what great collection we missed in the comments section below.)

10. Voivod - The Wake (Century Media)

The Voivod story continues with the Quebec powerhouse turning up the odd on this latest entry in the ongoing epic saga. Guitarist Daniel "Chewy" Mongrain adds new nuance and a brave strain of weird to the proceedings. On occasion, the songs taken on shades of the mainstream (though never in a way that will cause anyone to accuse the Voi of forsaking its Vod). Vocalist Denis "Snake" Bélanger performs with incredible vitality and hunger, sounding more like a man cutting his first album rather than something like his fourteenth. The quartet redefines epic on this affair, too, taking listeners into new aural dimensions that might seem unthinkable for stalwarts. Tunes such as "Orb Confusion" and "Sonic Mycelium" are, in their way, far more outre than anything this group has done in the past. Moreover, this seems like a fantastic billboard for Voivod's live shows and, in their way, making their case for an in-concert audio/visual set. Long may Voivod and all its weirdness run. Long may we bask in its brilliant, alien glow. – Jedd Beaudoin

Heavy Metal Guitarist by The Digital Artist (CC0 Creative Commons / Pixabay)

9. Kevin Hufnagel- Messages to the Past (Nightfloat)

Fans of classic shred metal albums get something of a treat via the latest by Gorguts/Byla guitar genius Kevin Hufnagel. Okay, while it's not exactly something that Shrapnel records would have issued in the summer of 1988, it's fairly close in spirit while also managing to capture the most sublime reaches of Hufnagel playing and compositions. "Pulse Controller" could be the title music for a slasher flick set in an emergency room on Halloween night; "Separations" speaks to the artist's deft melodic/harmonic touches, a supreme blend of raw emotion and superior technique; and "Inner Unseen" reminds us of his abilities not only on the electric form of his chosen instrument but its acoustic counterpart as well. Also, "Circling the Grave" and "A Flame to Guide" are rock history masterworks that verify Hufnagel's growing reputation is absolutely earned. A new gold standard in rock guitar records. – Jedd Beaudoin

8. Gazpacho - Soyuz (Kscope)

When it comes to evocative art rock permeated with philosophical lyricism, distressed singing, and stylishly erratic arrangements, no other band bests Norwegian sextet Gazpacho. Justly hailed for their idiosyncratic concoctions over the last 15 years, their past nine studio outings radiate their own identities while cumulating into a catalog of some of the most heartbreakingly elegant and sophisticated works in modern music. This year's Soyuz is no different. While not Gazpacho's best effort—that distinction still belongs to 2007's fifty-minute epic, Night, although 2012's March of Ghosts is a very close runner-up—it's still a narrative opus filled with all of the haunting quirks, enchanting melodies, and striving continuity admirers adore.

Marking the return of drummer Robert Johansen (who left in 2009), Soyuz revolves around "being frozen in time" and mourning "the death of the old world, where everywhere was a different place with cultures and beliefs to match" (as keyboardist Thomas Andersen explains). Appropriately, then, vocalist Jan-Henrik Ohme sounds as silkily sorrowful as ever, especially on the delicately orchestrated "Exit Suite" and the seductively peculiar and boisterous "Emperor Bespoke". Elsewhere, closer "Rappaccini" leaves listeners in breathtaking despondence with its blend of effects and instrumentation, while the one-two punch of opener "Soyuz One" and the penultimate "Soyuz Out" bring the album full circle with clever reprisals and multifaceted wonder. Like all Gazpacho records, Soyuz is a characteristic voyage of isolation and meditation that never truly leaves you. – Jordan Blum

7. Rikard Sjöblom's Gungfly – Friendship (InsideOut)

As the leader of the now-disbanded Swedish quartet Beardfish, singer/songwriter/multiinstrumentalist Rikard Sjöblom proved to be a master of fusing intricately vivacious scores and captivating songwriting (that ranged from perceptively traumatic to charmingly sophomoric). Naturally, those trademarks touch just about everything else he does, including the newest offering under the Rikard Sjöblom's Gungfly moniker, Friendship. Arguably on par with its immediately predecessor (On Her Journey to the Sun, which we placed at the #6 spot on our 2017 list), the full-length houses its touchingly nostalgic core within a whirlwind of colorful catchiness and density as only Sjöblom can craft.

Obviously, "If You Fall, Pt. II" is a clear highlight simply due to its ingenious mixture of feisty new ideas and gratifying links to the previous LP, whereas "Ghost of Vanity" is an irresistibly transformative and fun rocker that kickstarts the sequence wonderfully. That said, the true treasures lie within the complicated and lengthy title track, as well as the fondly melodic "They Fade" and the Zappa-esque "A Treehouse in a Glad". Together, they express the main theme of the record: the ways in which we share unbreakable bonds with people as children, only to become totally separated as we become adults. As a dedication to "all of [his] friends, dead or alive, past and present", Friendship captures the youthful joy and matured wisdom of its subject matter exquisitely. – Jordan Blum

6. Haken – Vector (InsideOut)

A wonderfully concise effort from this British prog-metal outfit that sometimes recalls Uriah Heep's mid-1970s tendency toward the horrifying and fantastical while remaining true to contemporary sensibilities. "The Good Doctor" is a wonderful sci-fi/psych-fi number that manages to gets its groove on like no progressive rock tune has a right to. Meanwhile, "Puzzle Box" puts veteran metal titans to shame with its riff-o-rama and attention to harrowing dynamics (and a penchant for off-kilter rhythmic passages). The 12-minute romp "Veil" disappoints in neither execution nor scope, hitting with an intensity that is alone worth the price of admission. If "Nil By Mouth" and "Host" don't inspire at least two generations of imitators, there's probably little hope for progressive metal or its fans. Though not light in terms of concept or subject matter, Vector is a thoroughly fun listen that never fails to hit the mark. – Jedd Beaudoin

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