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Reinventing Scotland, Reinventing Ourselves: After the Referendum
To be in the minority is the natural condition of artists. The referendum gave Scotland's creative community a brief respite from its sense of isolation. [30.Sep.14]
'Papers, Please' and the Bureacracy of Play
By Timothy Kennett
Lucas Pope's "bureaucracy simulator" both satirizes our information culture and reveals just how much we love mundane, everyday tasks. [30.Sep.14]
An Interview with 'Two Faces of January' Writer-Director Hossein Amini
"There’s something about identity I think is very fascinating and the idea of people having secrets and I think we all have that in our life." [30.Sep.14]
Prince: Art Official Age / Prince & 3rdeyegirl: PLECTRUMELECTRUM
These two new albums are welcome additions to Prince's canon, as none of his post-2004 comeback discs are as wall-to-wall fun as these are. [30.Sep.14]
How Women Dominated Pop Music in the '00s
We owe it to ourselves to recognize the many women in pop music that made an undeniable impact on popular culture and the world at large. [29.Sep.14]
Today's Articles
30.Sep.14
Prince: Art Official Age / Prince & 3rdeyegirl: PLECTRUMELECTRUM
These two new albums are welcome additions to Prince's canon, as none of his post-2004 comeback discs are as wall-to-wall fun as these are.
Luke Winslow-King: Everlasting Arms
Luke Winslow-King furthers his explorations of pre-war American music on his latest for Bloodshot.
S: Cool Choices
Former Carissa's Weird member Jenn Ghetto expands her solo project, S, into a full band for the best parts of Cool Choices. Oddly enough, it's when she's alone on the record that her emotions are the hardest to make out.
Zoot Woman: Star Climbing
Zoot Woman’s eagerly anticipated return to the electronic music scene rarely reaches the glittering heights of its shimmering title.
Deru: 1979
By making an album for himself, Benjamin Wynn just might end up pleasing everyone.
Bruce Hornsby: Solo Concerts
Hornsby explores his many, many sides on a double-disc that might be tough listening for fringe fans.
An Interview with 'Two Faces of January' Writer-Director Hossein Amini
"There’s something about identity I think is very fascinating and the idea of people having secrets and I think we all have that in our life."
'The Texas Chain Saw Massacre' Remains the Ultimate Revisionist Western 40 Years Later
It opens with images of mortality and ends with a monster’s operatic dance with a chain saw under a deathly, brooding Texas sun—it’s about America, man.
'Strange Lady in Town' Stresses the Importance of Women's Points of View
The movie's real point is its message about strong women, which makes it a surprisingly undated bit of relaxation that stresses female points of view.
Share 'Belzhar' With the YA in Your Life, But Enjoy It Yourself, Too
Jam Gallahue and her English classmates are given journals to keep. But when they begin writing, something strange happens.
'Papers, Please' and the Bureacracy of Play
Lucas Pope's "bureaucracy simulator" both satirizes our information culture and reveals just how much we love mundane, everyday tasks.
Culture
Reinventing Scotland, Reinventing Ourselves: After the Referendum
To be in the minority is the natural condition of artists. The referendum gave Scotland's creative community a brief respite from its sense of isolation.
Recent Articles
Monday, 29 September 2014
How Women Dominated Pop Music in the '00s
We owe it to ourselves to recognize the many women in pop music that made an undeniable impact on popular culture and the world at large.
Playing With Consistency Inconsistency: Jeff VanderMeer Takes Us into Area X
The adventurous Annihilation + the Raymond Chandler-like Authority + the existentialist Acceptance = the engaging Southern Reach Trilogy.
Thom Yorke: Tomorrow's Modern Boxes
Tomorrow's Modern Boxes isn't about any new technology, even with its faux-edgy release through bittorrent; it's about the old question about the power and limitations of our human containers.
'Cowboys and Indies' Is a Helluva Book That Will Become a Go-To Guide
Despite its awful title, Gareth Murphy's extensive and compelling tome is the kind of stuff that music nerds' dreams are made of.
The Rural Alberta Advantage: Mended With Gold
On third LP, Mended With Gold, the band pursues escape velocity with the most commitment yet, making the most bombastic and polished arrangements of their career.
You May Not Get It, But David Lynch Knows What He's Doing in 'Eraserhead'
It takes 89 minutes to watch David Lynch's Eraserhead, but it could take 89 years to figure out what the hell it was that you just saw.
There's Plenty of Realism in Land of Love and Drowning's Magic
While there's a fairy tale tone (think of the original ones, that don’t always have happily ever after endings), the characters are well developed and empathic.
Sun Ra and His Arkestra: In the Orbit of Ra
On In the Orbit of Ra Sun Ra collaborator and Arkestra member Marshall Allen presents a portrait of the jazz legend every bit as complicated and strange as a cross-section of his reality could possibly be.
Lowell: We Loved Her Dearly
If We Loved Her Dearly is any indication, Lowell has simply run out of material, if not ideas, musical or otherwise.
NONONO: We Are Only What We Feel
This electro-dance trio wants you to feel human. Easier done than said.
Sheer Terror: Standing Up for Falling Down
Hate Core is alive and well! Sheer Terror, New York hardcore hate-mongers, return with a new record, new line-up, and their same old abhorrence for, well… everything.
Friday, 26 September 2014
Three Great Albums Fade in Reflection
Despite their canonical status, Yankee Hotel Foxtrot, Oracular Spectacular, and White Blood Cells lack the staying power of truly great albums.
The Day the Old Batman-town Steel Mill Shut Down
Imagine Batman, the whole of the intellectual property, the full weight of publication and production history, now 75 years on from its inception, and imagine it as a town.
Singing Across Continents: An Interview with Somi
Somi is a not-exactly jazz singer with roots in Africa and the American midwest, and she has made the year's most amazing record, evoking the spirit of Lagos, Nigeria.
Counterbalance: Outkast's 'Stankonia'
Ain't nobody as dope as the 124th most acclaimed album of all time, so fresh and so clean. It loves it when you stare at it. A hip-hop game changer is this week's Counterbalance. Break!
Is There Hope for the Creative Underclass as the Internet Changes?
The People's Platform exposes the Internet's capitalist underbelly of exploitation, control and broken promises, while still managing to offer hope for an alternative.
Getting Lost in the South: The Hopscotch Music Festival 2014
Did I truly experience "the Real South" over the course of the Hopscotch Music Festival weekend?
Everything About 'The Equalizer' Is Wrong
As much as Robert (Denzel Washington) delivers action and melodramatic conventions, he also hints at another possibility entirely.
A Career in Rock Journalism Makes for Some 'Strange Days'
Throughout Strange Days Goodman displays elements of what the great Papa described as a “built in bullshit detector”.
'Blackbar,' The Epistolary Game
Blackbar is the only epistolary game I’ve ever played.
Chuck Prophet: Night Surfer
Despite the high anxiety, Night Surfer, Prophet’s 13th album, is pure-bred, colourful rock with a dark sense of humour.
Tom Hardy's Role in 'The Drop' Makes This Film More Than Just Another Noir
If you follow your instincts and bolt at the start of this sturdy and bleak noir, you miss Tom Hardy creating a thing of beauty yet again
Thursday, 25 September 2014
The '00s: Hip-Hop Got Weird at the Turn of the Century
Hip-hop's turn for the weird in the '00s ended up being one of the smartest moves it could take. Forget the old guard; 21st century hip-hop succeeded in improving on its forebears.
Cut! Shoot! The Directorial Styles of Blake Edwards and Richard Lester
The Party, A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum and Juggernaut give us good clean fun about slavery and brothels.
Exemplary Continuity in She-Hulk
“My own views on continuity are something of a mixed bag. Basically, I think the massive, over-populated mainstream superhero worlds create opportunities for interesting, inventive interactions between the disparate characters…”
Exploring the Loot Cave of 'Destiny'
Between the four of us shooting into the mouth of this cave there is an unspoken agreement.
'The Big Gundown' Has a Cat-and-Mouse Rhythm of Chasing and Escaping
For fans of spaghetti westerns, The Big Gundown is a must-see crowd pleaser.
Shonda Rhimes Takes Over Thursday Nights in 'How to Get Away With Murder'
How to Get Away with Murder is aimed to capture the essence of both of the Shonda Rhimes shows that precede it, Grey's Anatomy and Scandal.
'The Girls from Corona del Mar' Is a Serious Study of Female Friendship
The challenges of adulthood can alter the friendships we forge in childhood.
Leonard Cohen: Popular Problems
Cohen's 13th studio release offers nine powerful reflections on the sacred and the profane with characteristic mix of humor and longing.
Gdynia Film Festival 2014 Day 6: Closing Ceremony and Awards
Analysis of the winners and losers at Saturday night’s Gdynia Film Festival closing ceremony.
Perfume Genius: Too Bright
Glittered with transcendent brilliance, gilded shadows do not hide the empowered dramatic turn of Perfume Genius's Too Bright.
'The Childhood of Jesus' Has the Simplicity of Myth But None of the Clarity
Like many of J.M. Coetzee’s books, this one feels written for and about the author himself, ruthlessly interrogating his own beliefs and purpose.
Wednesday, 24 September 2014
The Future Is Now, and It Is Odd: A Retrospective on Hip-hop in the '00s
The historical unfolding of hip-hop bears a strong similarity to that of literature. With that lineage in mind, it's easy to see why the '00s found hip-hop taking on its postmodern stage.
A Soundtrack for Me and You: An Interview with Swan Dive
It's been a life-changing five years for Bill DeMain and Molly Felder since the last Swan Dive album, but their new music is still warm and enveloping, often wistful and nostalgic, and always memorable.
No One Wants to Play the Fool Like 'Watch Dog's Aiden Pierce
Watch Dog's protagonist is a cliché that never grows beyond cliché.
A Celebration of Carnage: 'Django Unchained' and 'Hotline Miami'
In the images of its aftermath, the act of violence is celebrated as an act of spectacular physical prowess and moral potency.
How the Fashion Industry Cannibalises the Planet
Stiched Up is an accessible, lucid book that analyses the exploitation inherent in capitalism through the often violent operations of the fashion industry.
Berlin Is Still at It in 'The Blacklist'
Unlike weekly procedurals that wrap up everything with a bow, the knots tied in The Blacklist are entwined on frayed ribbon that runs the risk of falling apart.
If We'd Never Had to Fight a War: The Multiversity: The Society of Super-Heroes #1
Tell your people, your super-people, that it won't stop here. It's coming your way, too. And if you have no super-people, may the lord have mercy.
Troubled Loners of the World Unite!
Sarah Maitland writes How to Be Alone as much for us not-so-troubled loners as she does for the chronically extroverted.
Tweedy: Sukierae
Tweedy father and son combo journey down a road of reflection and introspection.
Erasure: The Violet Flame
The Violet Flame doesn't really reignite Erasure so much as keeps their torch going..
Fair Enough at the Very Least: 'The Legend of Billie Jean: Fair Is Fair Edition'
One might believe in the "Legend" of Billie Jean Davy if the distributor cared a little more about extras.
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